Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

INTRA- AND INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE CONTACT CALLS OF SPECTACLED PARROTLETS (FORPUS CONSPICILLATUS)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

The ability to discriminate individuals or different social classes of individuals is important for the evolution of social behaviour. In animal societies with ample social relationships selection will often favour the capacity to signal and perceive the identity and the membership to a certain social class. Spectacled parrotlets (Forpus conspicillatus, Psittacidae, Psittaciformes) live in a complex system of social relationships throughout their lives and are able to recognize their mates and their siblings on the basis of their contact calls. Here we attempt to identify the acoustic parameters that might be used in individual recognition and recognition of social categories. Therefore we analysed recordings of contact calls with reference to the variation of certain acoustical parameters. There was significant interindividual variation in the peak frequency, maximum frequency, duration, energy, bandwidth and minimum frequency in the contact calls of spectacled parrotlets. Discriminant function analysis has shown individual and social subunit specific calls but also that individuals of different social classes share some calls. From our results we hypothesize that spectacled parrotlets could use at least six acoustical cues in their contact calls that might encode information about the individual, the age class, the pair, the pairing status and the family.

Affiliations: 1: Arbeitsbereich Ethologie, Zoologisches Institut und Zoologisches Museum, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany

10.1163/156853901752233361
/content/journals/10.1163/156853901752233361
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853901752233361
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853901752233361
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853901752233361
2001-06-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation