Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

FEMALE RESISTANCE AND MATING OUTCOMES IN A STREAM-DWELLING ISOPOD: EFFECTS OF MALE ENERGY RESERVES AND MATING HISTORY

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

In the stream-dwelling isopod, Lirceus fontinalis, conspicuous mating contests occur between males and females prior to pair formation. Our previous work has shown that female resistance during contests determines contest outcomes. Here we examined whether female resistance could act as a mechanism of choice in which females discriminate against males with low energy (glycogen) reserves. We manipulated male glycogen levels by chasing males around a race-track then exposed females to males that differed in glycogen levels. We found that high-glycogen males were more successful than low-glycogen males and that this effect appeared to be due to increased female resistance towards low-glycogen males. We then examined one potential benefit to females of energy-based mate discrimination. In L. fontinalis, male mating history and levels of glycogen reserves are correlated, i.e. recently mated males are glycogen-depleted due to energy costs associated with mating. We examined whether recently mated males were also costly mates, and thus should be avoided by females. We quantified the relationship between male mating history and female fertilization success and found that females suffered an 18% reduction in fertilization success by mating with a male that had recently inseminated another female. We propose that female resistance could act as a mechanism of choice in which males with low energy reserves are avoided and that one benefit of this discrimination is that females increase fertilization success be avoiding males that have recently mated.

10.1163/156853902320387873
/content/journals/10.1163/156853902320387873
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853902320387873
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853902320387873
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853902320387873
2002-07-01
2017-10-18

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation