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PLAYBACKS OF LOUD CALLS TO WILD THOMAS LANGURS (PRIMATES; PRESBYTIS THOMASI): THE EFFECT OF LOCATION

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image of Behaviour

Animals may behave aggressively towards neighbours. For several bird species it has been shown that males react more vigorously towards calls of neighbours from the centre of their home range than from the edge. This is usually explained by assuming that the centre of a home range is of higher value to a male than the edge. To test these ideas for a primate species, we conducted experiments with playbacks of loud calls on wild male and female Thomas langurs (Presbytis thomasi). These animals may defend resources in their range or protect their offspring from infanticide and males may defend their females. In natural situations between-group encounters in the centre of a home range by the intruding neighbour are more often accompanied by infanticidal attempts than encounters at the edge. Loud calls of neighbours played back from the centre of the home range caused a more vigorous reaction from the resident male than calls from the edge. However, males in food-containing trees did not respond differently to edge playbacks from males in non-food-containing trees. Although males seem to defend resources and not mates, male behaviour may be best explained by defence of infants against infanticide. Female behaviour is best explained by resource defence.

10.1163/15685390252902283
/content/journals/10.1163/15685390252902283
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/content/journals/10.1163/15685390252902283
2002-01-01
2016-12-04

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