Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

COURTSHIP DISPLAYS OF INTROGRESSED, INTERSPECIFIC HYBRID NASONIA MALES: FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE 'GRANDFATHER EFFECT'

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

Previously, we investigated courtship behaviour of bidirectional, interspecific hybrid males of two species of Nasonia (Beukeboom & van den Assem, 2001). Characteristics of the displays were intermediate between those of the parental species, but at the same time were biased towards the paternal side. Due to the haplodiploid sex determination system of the Hymenoptera, the nearest male parent of the haploid (hence, fatherless) Nasonia males are their grandfather. Therefore, we have called this bias the 'grandfather effect'. In the present paper, we investigate one of the possible causes of the 'grandfather effect': nucleocytoplasmic interaction. In interspecific hybrids, the paternally donated nuclear genes must operate in an 'alien' environment: the maternal (heterospecific) cytoplasm. Adverse effects may prevail in this situation, and result in a biased gene transmission (although to the maternal side). With introgression techniques and subsequent hybridisation of introgressed lines, we constructed male progeny in which paternally contributed nuclear genes are conspecific with the maternal cytoplasm. Courtship of these males provide a test of the interaction hypothesis. Because our results show a persistence of the 'grandfather effect', a simple nucleo-cytoplasmic interaction seems an unlikely explanation of the phenomenon.

10.1163/15685390260337886
/content/journals/10.1163/15685390260337886
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15685390260337886
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15685390260337886
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15685390260337886
2002-08-01
2016-12-06

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation