Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Behavioural Development in Male Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): Puberty to Adulthood

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

[Adolescence, the period between puberty and the attainment of full adult size and appearance, is a distinct and important developmental period in primates. Although adolescence can account for a significant proportion of a male's reproductive lifespan in highly sexually dimorphic species, few studies have concentrated on adolescent development. In male mandrills, puberty begins before 4 yr, but males continue to grow and develop for a further 6 yr, attaining adult size and appearance at 10 yr. Concurrently, males become peripheral to the social group of females and their offspring. This study aimed to describe behavioural development in adolescent male mandrills, and to examine the process of peripheralisation and reintegration into the social group. I made 20 months of daily behavioural observations on 19 post-pubertal males living in two semifree-ranging groups of mandrills at the Centre International de Recherches Médicales in Franceville, Gabon. As age and morphological development increased, and males peripheralised, social behaviours (grooming and play) decreased, involvement in aggression increased, and sexual behaviour increased per time that males spent with the social group. Behavioural changes were gradual and male peripheralisation was voluntary; males were not actively evicted by the dominant male or other group members. At the end of adolescence one individual in each group took-over as alpha male and re-entered the social group while other males remained peripheral or solitary, and I discuss the differences between successful males and their peers. Finally, I examine the possible proximate and ultimate causes underlying peripheralisation in male mandrills, concluding that peripheralisation represents a tactic to avoid feeding and male-male competition, while undergoing dramatic development in body size and morphology, in order to compete effectively for access to mates as an adult., Adolescence, the period between puberty and the attainment of full adult size and appearance, is a distinct and important developmental period in primates. Although adolescence can account for a significant proportion of a male's reproductive lifespan in highly sexually dimorphic species, few studies have concentrated on adolescent development. In male mandrills, puberty begins before 4 yr, but males continue to grow and develop for a further 6 yr, attaining adult size and appearance at 10 yr. Concurrently, males become peripheral to the social group of females and their offspring. This study aimed to describe behavioural development in adolescent male mandrills, and to examine the process of peripheralisation and reintegration into the social group. I made 20 months of daily behavioural observations on 19 post-pubertal males living in two semifree-ranging groups of mandrills at the Centre International de Recherches Médicales in Franceville, Gabon. As age and morphological development increased, and males peripheralised, social behaviours (grooming and play) decreased, involvement in aggression increased, and sexual behaviour increased per time that males spent with the social group. Behavioural changes were gradual and male peripheralisation was voluntary; males were not actively evicted by the dominant male or other group members. At the end of adolescence one individual in each group took-over as alpha male and re-entered the social group while other males remained peripheral or solitary, and I discuss the differences between successful males and their peers. Finally, I examine the possible proximate and ultimate causes underlying peripheralisation in male mandrills, concluding that peripheralisation represents a tactic to avoid feeding and male-male competition, while undergoing dramatic development in body size and morphology, in order to compete effectively for access to mates as an adult.]

10.1163/156853903322589641
/content/journals/10.1163/156853903322589641
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853903322589641
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853903322589641
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853903322589641
2003-08-15
2016-12-10

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation