Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Male Brook Sticklebacks' (Culaea Inconstans) Response to Olfactory Cues

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Behaviour

[Male brook sticklebacks were capable of recognizing and discriminating between the scent from nesting, conspecific males and ovulated, conspecific females. In recognition trials, they spent more time near the female, than near the male scent. Males spent more time near the male scent during the choice trials because they decreased the amount the amount of time spent near the female cue. Male brook sticklebacks were capable of recognizing and discriminating between the scent from ovulated conspecific and heterospecific (Gasterosteus aculeatus) females. They were not attracted to the scent from the heterospecific, but they did spend more time near the surface and direct more surface nudges towards the stimulus drip, indicating that they recognized the cue on some level. When the cues were presented together, males spent more time on the conspecific side. Males only directed courtship pummels towards the female-based cue. The intensity of pummeling can be arranged as: number to conspecific female ≫ number heterospecific female > number to conspecific male or water control. The number of courtship pummels directed towards the conspecific female stimulus decreased significantly when the odour of a conspecific male or heterospecific female was present. This paper contributes to the growing database demonstrating that courtship communication in gasterosteids is multimodal, encompassing (minimally) visual and olfactory components., Male brook sticklebacks were capable of recognizing and discriminating between the scent from nesting, conspecific males and ovulated, conspecific females. In recognition trials, they spent more time near the female, than near the male scent. Males spent more time near the male scent during the choice trials because they decreased the amount the amount of time spent near the female cue. Male brook sticklebacks were capable of recognizing and discriminating between the scent from ovulated conspecific and heterospecific (Gasterosteus aculeatus) females. They were not attracted to the scent from the heterospecific, but they did spend more time near the surface and direct more surface nudges towards the stimulus drip, indicating that they recognized the cue on some level. When the cues were presented together, males spent more time on the conspecific side. Males only directed courtship pummels towards the female-based cue. The intensity of pummeling can be arranged as: number to conspecific female ≫ number heterospecific female > number to conspecific male or water control. The number of courtship pummels directed towards the conspecific female stimulus decreased significantly when the odour of a conspecific male or heterospecific female was present. This paper contributes to the growing database demonstrating that courtship communication in gasterosteids is multimodal, encompassing (minimally) visual and olfactory components.]

10.1163/1568539042948132
/content/journals/10.1163/1568539042948132
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1568539042948132
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/1568539042948132
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1568539042948132
2004-11-01
2016-09-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation