Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The effects of group size, shape and composition on ease of detection of cryptic prey

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Behaviour

[The role of aggregation in prey defence has been the subject of much debate. For example, the commonly cited assumption of encounter-dilution effects requires that attack rates increase asymptotically with increasing group size. One key parameter that is still poorly understood is how ease of detection of cryptic prey aggregations is affected by group size, shape, density and composition. We have developed a computer based visual test to elucidate these effects using human subjects. We show that ease of detection of cryptic prey increases asymptotically and quickly saturates with group size: this is in accordance with a previously reported laboratory test of birds. We also discovered that horizontally-orientated groups were more easily detected than either circular or vertically arranged ones. No effect of the degree of spatial clustering of prey occurring in groups was found, and nor did heterogeneity or homogeneity in the visual appearance of group members affect ease of detection — although future work on these aspects is warranted., The role of aggregation in prey defence has been the subject of much debate. For example, the commonly cited assumption of encounter-dilution effects requires that attack rates increase asymptotically with increasing group size. One key parameter that is still poorly understood is how ease of detection of cryptic prey aggregations is affected by group size, shape, density and composition. We have developed a computer based visual test to elucidate these effects using human subjects. We show that ease of detection of cryptic prey increases asymptotically and quickly saturates with group size: this is in accordance with a previously reported laboratory test of birds. We also discovered that horizontally-orientated groups were more easily detected than either circular or vertically arranged ones. No effect of the degree of spatial clustering of prey occurring in groups was found, and nor did heterogeneity or homogeneity in the visual appearance of group members affect ease of detection — although future work on these aspects is warranted.]

10.1163/1568539054729105
/content/journals/10.1163/1568539054729105
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1568539054729105
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/1568539054729105
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1568539054729105
2005-06-01
2016-08-30

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation