Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The effects of male proximity, apparent size, and absolute size on female preference in the sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Behaviour

[Female sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna) prefer males of greater lateral projection area. This preference may reflect perceptual constraints on the female. A larger male may project a larger image onto the female's retina at a given viewing distance. This may elicit greater stimulation of the visual system and thus a stronger behavioral response. This study investigates the effects of male proximity, apparent size, and absolute size on female preference in sailfin mollies. I examine whether females base their mate preferences on the male's actual size, or on the size of the image he projects on the female's retina (apparent size). The question of actual vs apparent size preferences in fish has been addressed within the context of optimal prey-size selection, but this study is believed to be the first to examine the question in the context of sexual selection. I presented females with pairs of dummy males in seven treatments organized into four categories: (1) The Actual Size Control — a single treatment where male actual size was held constant while varying female viewing distance; (2) The Distance Controls — three treatments in which male distance from the female subject was held constant, while varying actual size; (3) The Apparent Size Controls — two treatments where both body size and viewing distances varied, while holding apparent size constant; and (4) The Experimental treatment — a single test in which the smaller male of the pair appeared larger. In each of the Actual Size and Distance Control treatments, females preferred the closer and larger males, respectively. However, females exhibited no preferences in either of the Apparent Size Control treatments. Additionally, females in the Experimental treatment preferred the apparently larger dummy to the male that was actually larger. These results suggest that female preference for male size is based on the male's apparent size — i.e., that preference is based on the size of the image projected on the female's retina, rather than the male's actual body size. The evolutionary implications of these results with regard to courtship strategies and male secondary sex traits are discussed., Female sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna) prefer males of greater lateral projection area. This preference may reflect perceptual constraints on the female. A larger male may project a larger image onto the female's retina at a given viewing distance. This may elicit greater stimulation of the visual system and thus a stronger behavioral response. This study investigates the effects of male proximity, apparent size, and absolute size on female preference in sailfin mollies. I examine whether females base their mate preferences on the male's actual size, or on the size of the image he projects on the female's retina (apparent size). The question of actual vs apparent size preferences in fish has been addressed within the context of optimal prey-size selection, but this study is believed to be the first to examine the question in the context of sexual selection. I presented females with pairs of dummy males in seven treatments organized into four categories: (1) The Actual Size Control — a single treatment where male actual size was held constant while varying female viewing distance; (2) The Distance Controls — three treatments in which male distance from the female subject was held constant, while varying actual size; (3) The Apparent Size Controls — two treatments where both body size and viewing distances varied, while holding apparent size constant; and (4) The Experimental treatment — a single test in which the smaller male of the pair appeared larger. In each of the Actual Size and Distance Control treatments, females preferred the closer and larger males, respectively. However, females exhibited no preferences in either of the Apparent Size Control treatments. Additionally, females in the Experimental treatment preferred the apparently larger dummy to the male that was actually larger. These results suggest that female preference for male size is based on the male's apparent size — i.e., that preference is based on the size of the image projected on the female's retina, rather than the male's actual body size. The evolutionary implications of these results with regard to courtship strategies and male secondary sex traits are discussed.]

10.1163/156853906779367026
/content/journals/10.1163/156853906779367026
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853906779367026
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853906779367026
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853906779367026
2006-12-01
2016-08-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation