Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Avoidance of predator chemical cues by bats: an experimental assessment

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

[Predation places selection pressure on the behaviour of organisms, but the effect of predation risk on bat behaviour has gone largely untested. Using a Y-maze, we tested the hypothesis that female big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) avoid olfactory cues from known predators — raccoons (Procyon lotor) and black rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta). These chemical cues are most likely encountered by bats during the assessment of potential roost sites, so avoidance of predator cues could affect roost selection. We found that big brown bats do not avoid cues from raccoon urine and there was a non-significant trend for bats to choose the arm with black rat snake cues. In a second experiment, bats were exposed to olfactory and potentially auditory cues of live black rat snakes. Bats tended to avoid the arm with live snakes, although results were non-significant. This suggests olfactory cues may not be representative of live snakes, or that auditory cues may be more important than olfactory cues for predator recognition. During late spring, female bats often avoid torpor for thermoregulatory or reproductive reasons. Therefore, bats may be alert to the approach of predators and be less responsive to chemical cues compared to other times of the year., Predation places selection pressure on the behaviour of organisms, but the effect of predation risk on bat behaviour has gone largely untested. Using a Y-maze, we tested the hypothesis that female big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) avoid olfactory cues from known predators — raccoons (Procyon lotor) and black rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta). These chemical cues are most likely encountered by bats during the assessment of potential roost sites, so avoidance of predator cues could affect roost selection. We found that big brown bats do not avoid cues from raccoon urine and there was a non-significant trend for bats to choose the arm with black rat snake cues. In a second experiment, bats were exposed to olfactory and potentially auditory cues of live black rat snakes. Bats tended to avoid the arm with live snakes, although results were non-significant. This suggests olfactory cues may not be representative of live snakes, or that auditory cues may be more important than olfactory cues for predator recognition. During late spring, female bats often avoid torpor for thermoregulatory or reproductive reasons. Therefore, bats may be alert to the approach of predators and be less responsive to chemical cues compared to other times of the year.]

Affiliations: 1: Center for North American Bat Research and Conservation, Department of Ecology and Organismal Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA;, Email: jboyles3@indstate.edu; 2: Department of Ecology and Organismal Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA

10.1163/156853907781871806
/content/journals/10.1163/156853907781871806
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853907781871806
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853907781871806
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853907781871806
2007-09-01
2017-09-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation