Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella), with special reference to conspecifics' foraging artefacts as an indirect social influence

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

[Wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella) in Raleighvallen, Suriname forage on larvae hidden inside bamboo stalks via searching and extractive behaviours. We found that developing proficiency at obtaining larvae from bamboo stalks extends through several years of juvenescence. Older juveniles pass through a transition from a juvenile pattern to an adult pattern of foraging efficiency and diet selection. Whereas most studies have investigated the contribution of direct interactions between a naïve individual and a competent forager on the acquisition of foraging expertise, we focused on indirect social influence through foraging artefacts left in the habitat by conspecifics. Young individuals foraged at bamboo stalks more often shortly after than shortly before encountering bamboo segments previously opened by foragers to extract larvae. We discuss this result in terms of stimulus enhancement and social facilitation. In capuchins, learning how to forage on difficult foods does not necessarily occur in the presence of other group members, and social influences can be delayed in time and separate in space from others. This study provides an original view on how the gradual acquisition of foraging competence in brown capuchins is aided jointly by physical maturation and indirect social input that provides opportunities to practice appropriate foraging actions., Wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella) in Raleighvallen, Suriname forage on larvae hidden inside bamboo stalks via searching and extractive behaviours. We found that developing proficiency at obtaining larvae from bamboo stalks extends through several years of juvenescence. Older juveniles pass through a transition from a juvenile pattern to an adult pattern of foraging efficiency and diet selection. Whereas most studies have investigated the contribution of direct interactions between a naïve individual and a competent forager on the acquisition of foraging expertise, we focused on indirect social influence through foraging artefacts left in the habitat by conspecifics. Young individuals foraged at bamboo stalks more often shortly after than shortly before encountering bamboo segments previously opened by foragers to extract larvae. We discuss this result in terms of stimulus enhancement and social facilitation. In capuchins, learning how to forage on difficult foods does not necessarily occur in the presence of other group members, and social influences can be delayed in time and separate in space from others. This study provides an original view on how the gradual acquisition of foraging competence in brown capuchins is aided jointly by physical maturation and indirect social input that provides opportunities to practice appropriate foraging actions.]

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853907783244701
2008-02-01
2015-03-02

Affiliations: 1: Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA;, Email: nogu@uga.edu; 2: Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3: Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to email alerts
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation