Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Non-invasive measurement of steroids in fish-holding water: important considerations when applying the procedure to behaviour studies

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

[Fish behaviourists are increasingly turning to non-invasive measurement of steroid hormones in holding water, as opposed to blood plasma. When some of us met at a workshop in Faro, Portugal, in September, 2007, we realised that there were still many issues concerning the application of this procedure that needed resolution, including: Why do we measure release rates rather than just concentrations of steroids in the water? How does one interpret steroid release rates when dealing with fish of different sizes? What are the merits of measuring conjugated as well as free steroids in water? In the ‘static’ sampling procedure, where fish are placed in a separate container for a short period of time, does this affect steroid release — and, if so, how can it be minimised? After exposing a fish to a behavioural stimulus, when is the optimal time to sample? What is the minimum amount of validation when applying the procedure to a new species? The purpose of this review is to attempt to answer these questions and, in doing so, to emphasize that application of the non-invasive procedure requires more planning and validation than conventional plasma sampling. However, we consider that the rewards justify the extra effort., Fish behaviourists are increasingly turning to non-invasive measurement of steroid hormones in holding water, as opposed to blood plasma. When some of us met at a workshop in Faro, Portugal, in September, 2007, we realised that there were still many issues concerning the application of this procedure that needed resolution, including: Why do we measure release rates rather than just concentrations of steroids in the water? How does one interpret steroid release rates when dealing with fish of different sizes? What are the merits of measuring conjugated as well as free steroids in water? In the ‘static’ sampling procedure, where fish are placed in a separate container for a short period of time, does this affect steroid release — and, if so, how can it be minimised? After exposing a fish to a behavioural stimulus, when is the optimal time to sample? What is the minimum amount of validation when applying the procedure to a new species? The purpose of this review is to attempt to answer these questions and, in doing so, to emphasize that application of the non-invasive procedure requires more planning and validation than conventional plasma sampling. However, we consider that the rewards justify the extra effort.]

Affiliations: 1: Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Barrack Road, The Nothe, Weymouth DT4 8UB, UK;, Email: Alexander.Scott@cefas.co.uk; 2: Konrad Lorenz Research Station, University of Vienna, A-4645 Gruenau 11, Austria; 3: University of Bern, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Finkenhubelweg 11, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland; 4: ISPA, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34, Lisboa 1149-041, Portugal; 5: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Box 870344, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA; 6: University of Exeter, School of Biosciences, The Hatherly Laboratories, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter EX4 4PS, UK; 7: Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Barrack Road, The Nothe, Weymouth DT4 8UB, UK; 8: University of Crete, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71409 Heraklion, Crete, Greece; 9: Centro de Ciências do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, Faro 8005-139, Portugal

10.1163/156853908785765854
/content/journals/10.1163/156853908785765854
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853908785765854
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853908785765854
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853908785765854
2008-10-01
2016-12-10

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation