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Descriptive Analysis and Social Correlates of Agonistic Displays of Anolis Limifrons (Sauria, Iguanidae)

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[Analysis of 666 filmed displays of 23 male Anolis limifrons from Panama revealed: 1) The species has an agonistic repertoire of five head bob patterns (A-E) and one dewlap display. 2) During male-male interactions, the decrease in intermale distance correlates with a progression of display usage from A → B → C → D → E. 3) When lizards exchanged displays within a short time span (1 min), the answering animal usually performed a display type of the same or the next type up in the A → E series, almost never was the answering type further down in the A → E series. 4) The D display is the most elaborate pattern and the E type the least; the E display occurred during face off orientations between combatants when they were within leaping distance of each other. 5) There was a trend for display modifiers to appear with greater frequency with the progression of display types from A to E. 6) Displays were frequently performed in volleys of two to four displays at a time, usually being three to a volley. 7) The first display of a volley was always of "higher" type in the display series A → E than the subsequent display of a volley i.e., B, A, A ; C, B, A ; D, A, A) ; if all the displays of a volley were of the same type, the first contained more modifiers than the others (e.g., introductory movements, more head bobs). 8) Presumably, the stepwise progression of display types from A to E during agonistic encounters reflects increase in motivational state., Analysis of 666 filmed displays of 23 male Anolis limifrons from Panama revealed: 1) The species has an agonistic repertoire of five head bob patterns (A-E) and one dewlap display. 2) During male-male interactions, the decrease in intermale distance correlates with a progression of display usage from A → B → C → D → E. 3) When lizards exchanged displays within a short time span (1 min), the answering animal usually performed a display type of the same or the next type up in the A → E series, almost never was the answering type further down in the A → E series. 4) The D display is the most elaborate pattern and the E type the least; the E display occurred during face off orientations between combatants when they were within leaping distance of each other. 5) There was a trend for display modifiers to appear with greater frequency with the progression of display types from A to E. 6) Displays were frequently performed in volleys of two to four displays at a time, usually being three to a volley. 7) The first display of a volley was always of "higher" type in the display series A → E than the subsequent display of a volley i.e., B, A, A ; C, B, A ; D, A, A) ; if all the displays of a volley were of the same type, the first contained more modifiers than the others (e.g., introductory movements, more head bobs). 8) Presumably, the stepwise progression of display types from A to E during agonistic encounters reflects increase in motivational state.]

Affiliations: 1: (Biology Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Va., U.S.A.

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