Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The Relation Between the Eating System and the Grooming System in Rats, Rattus Norvegicus Albinus

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

[Des experiences ont été faites, afin de montrer que des rats affamés dont la fourrure a été mouillée ont moins de comportement de toilettage en présence de nourriture qu'en son absence. Si les animaux mangent, le système nutritif a une influence inhibitrice sur le système de comportment de toilettage. Quant au comportement de toilettage, les rats saturés de nourriture ne diffèrent pas des rats privés de nourriture, puis empechés de manger. Il y a une influence inhibitrice du système nutritif quel que soit le degré de privation de nourriture bien que les effets soient plus marqués lorsque la privation est plus importante: un mécanisme de travail en simultanéité règle l'alternance des comportements de nutrition et de toilettage. Travail en simultanéité signifie selon MCFARLAND que le système de comportement dominant inhibe et désinhibe alternativement le système de comportement subdominant. Pas seulement pendant les actes nutritifs, mais aussi pendant la tendence appétitive il n'y a pas, ou presque pas de comportement de toilettage. La peur, évoquée par des chocs électriques a une influence inhibitrice sur le comportement de toilettage semblable au système nutritif. Ces conclusions affirment que c'est surtout pendant l'actualisation d'un système de comportement qu'il y a inhibition et que s'il y a activation sans actualisation l'influence inhibitrice est minime., Des experiences ont été faites, afin de montrer que des rats affamés dont la fourrure a été mouillée ont moins de comportement de toilettage en présence de nourriture qu'en son absence. Si les animaux mangent, le système nutritif a une influence inhibitrice sur le système de comportment de toilettage. Quant au comportement de toilettage, les rats saturés de nourriture ne diffèrent pas des rats privés de nourriture, puis empechés de manger. Il y a une influence inhibitrice du système nutritif quel que soit le degré de privation de nourriture bien que les effets soient plus marqués lorsque la privation est plus importante: un mécanisme de travail en simultanéité règle l'alternance des comportements de nutrition et de toilettage. Travail en simultanéité signifie selon MCFARLAND que le système de comportement dominant inhibe et désinhibe alternativement le système de comportement subdominant. Pas seulement pendant les actes nutritifs, mais aussi pendant la tendence appétitive il n'y a pas, ou presque pas de comportement de toilettage. La peur, évoquée par des chocs électriques a une influence inhibitrice sur le comportement de toilettage semblable au système nutritif. Ces conclusions affirment que c'est surtout pendant l'actualisation d'un système de comportement qu'il y a inhibition et que s'il y a activation sans actualisation l'influence inhibitrice est minime.]

Affiliations: 1: Psychological Laboratory, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

10.1163/156853982X00526
/content/journals/10.1163/156853982x00526
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853982x00526
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853982x00526
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853982x00526
1982-01-01
2016-12-02

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation