Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Sign Stimuli in the Threespine Stickleback (Gasterosteus Aculeatus): a Re-Examination and Extension of Some Classic Experiments

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Behaviour

1. Both Long Island and Dutch territorial male Gasterosteus aculeatus exhibited considerable variation in their responses to dummies. Such responses were generally consistent within the same individual presented with the same dummy: male dummies evoked primarily aggressive behavior and female dummies evoked primarily courtship. However, males from both Long Island and Dutch populations sometimes directed courtship to male dummies and aggression to female dummies. 2. Males from both populations generally directed more aggression (bites) to the silver male dummy than to the dummy male bearing red undersides and blue eyes (i.e. , nuptial coloration). However, exceptional males from both populations showed the opposite trend. In trials with Dutch males in which backoffs could be measured, this behavior was more often directed to the nuptially colored dummy male than to the silver one. 3. Males from the Long Island population directed more activities, especially bites, to the horizontal dummy male than to either the headup or headdown dummy male. These males exhibited no difference in frequencies of behaviors directed to headup and headdown dummy males. Dutch males were only tested with headup vs horizontal dummy males and they too directed more activities, especially bites, to the latter. 4. Males from the Long Island population directed more courtship (zigzags and leads) and aggression (bites) to the dummy female with the greater abdominal distention, even when such distention was extreme (supernormal). Dutch males were only tested with (normally) gravid vs supergravid dummy females and they directed more activities, especially zigzags, to the latter. 5. Males from the Long Island population directed more courtship (zigzags and leads) and aggression (bites) to the horizontal dummy female than to either the headup or headdown one. Dutch males were only tested with headup vs horizontal dummy females and directed more courtship to the latter.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853986x00919
1985-01-01
2015-03-28

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 U.S.A.; 2: Department of Ethology, Zoological Laboratory, University of Leiden, The Netherlands

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to email alerts
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation