Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Sound Production and Reproductive Ecology of Strongly Acoustic Fish in Africa: Pollimyrus Isidori, Mormyridae

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

[We have studied the reproductive ecology and bioacoustic signals of weakly electric mormyrid fish in Africa in order to discover the natural conditions under which acoustic signals are used and to gain insight into the evolution of their acoustic behaviour and hearing. Pollimyrus isidori migrated from a tributary of the Niger River (Mali) into a shallow (2-3 m) flood plain during the onset of the flooding seasons (August, 1991 and 1994). The fish were fully primed for reproduction upon entering the plain, females were significantly larger than males, and the sex ratio was skewed toward males (about 2 males per female). Males established territories (d ~ 1 m) within the roots of floating rafts of grasses, about 0.5 m below the water surface. Males produced conspicuous acoustic displays consisting of Grunts and Moans during the night (130 dB peak re 1 μLPa at approximately 10 cm). These sounds had a fundamental of 340 Hz, but the band-width of the grunt extended to over 3 kHz. Experiments at the field site with captive animals showed that male sound production was stimulated by the presence of conspecific females. The P. isidori repertoire included 3 additional sounds. Analysis of environmental noise showed that these communication sounds fall within a distinct spectral window, thereby minimizing potential interference from other aquatic animals and abiotic noise sources. Waveform analyses showed that the sounds remained coherent over short distances (0.5 m) but lost amplitude more rapidly than would be predicted in a deep water free-field., We have studied the reproductive ecology and bioacoustic signals of weakly electric mormyrid fish in Africa in order to discover the natural conditions under which acoustic signals are used and to gain insight into the evolution of their acoustic behaviour and hearing. Pollimyrus isidori migrated from a tributary of the Niger River (Mali) into a shallow (2-3 m) flood plain during the onset of the flooding seasons (August, 1991 and 1994). The fish were fully primed for reproduction upon entering the plain, females were significantly larger than males, and the sex ratio was skewed toward males (about 2 males per female). Males established territories (d ~ 1 m) within the roots of floating rafts of grasses, about 0.5 m below the water surface. Males produced conspicuous acoustic displays consisting of Grunts and Moans during the night (130 dB peak re 1 μLPa at approximately 10 cm). These sounds had a fundamental of 340 Hz, but the band-width of the grunt extended to over 3 kHz. Experiments at the field site with captive animals showed that male sound production was stimulated by the presence of conspecific females. The P. isidori repertoire included 3 additional sounds. Analysis of environmental noise showed that these communication sounds fall within a distinct spectral window, thereby minimizing potential interference from other aquatic animals and abiotic noise sources. Waveform analyses showed that the sounds remained coherent over short distances (0.5 m) but lost amplitude more rapidly than would be predicted in a deep water free-field.]

Affiliations: 1: Department of Psychology and Institute for Neurological Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, 3815 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; 2: Institut Alfred Fessard, 1 Avenue de la Térrasse, CNRS 91198, Gif-Sur-Yvette, France; 3: ORSTOM, 213, rue La Fayette, 75480 Paris Cedex 10, France

10.1163/156853997X00034
/content/journals/10.1163/156853997x00034
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853997x00034
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853997x00034
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853997x00034
1997-01-01
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation