Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

ORIENTATION OF TIGRIOPUS CALIFORNICUS (COPEPODA, HARPACTICOIDA) TO NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL SUBSTRATA

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[The harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus was introduced into culture dishes containing either mimics, extract, or fragments of two macroalgae commonly found in the copepod’s supralittoral habitat: the tubular Enteromorpha compressa and the encrusting, Ralfsia-like alternate phase of Scytosiphon lomentaria in equal abundance. Natural and artificial food sources were offered equivalently with control substrata and the copepod’s position relative to each surface was recorded on videotape over a 12-hour period. The copepods preferred experimental treatments to controls immediately after introduction (within 1 hour) but favored the controls after 12 hours. This suggests either (1) a more random orientation after an initial feeding to relieve starvation; or (2) over time, dissolved organic material more fully permeated the water in each dish. The copepods also preferred the extract of S. lomentaria crust to that of E. compressa, perhaps due to a higher content of dissolved organic matter in the former treatments. Extracts of both algae were preferred over their respective mimics, suggesting a chemical (non-visual) response to dissolved organic matter.

Le copépode harpacticï ide Tigriopus californicus a été introduit dans des boîtes de culture contenant soit des imitations, soit un extrait, soit des fragments de deux macroalgues communément trouvées dans l’habitat supralittoral du copépode: l’algue tubulaire Enteromorpha compressa et l’algue incrustante, dans sa phase ressemblant à Ralfsia, Scytosiphon lomentaria, en quantités égales. Les nourritures naturelles et artificielles étaient offertes en quantités équivalentes avec un substrat témoin et la position du copépode sur chaque surface était enregistré sur bande vidéo sur une période de 12 heures. Les copépodes ont préféré les traitements expérimentaux aux témoins, dès leur introduction (pendant une heure), mais ont préféré les témoins après 12 heures. Ceci suggère soit (1) une orientation plus au hasard, après une alimentation initiale pour couper le jeûne; ou (2) le temps écoulé, la matière organique dissoute s’est répandue plus largement dans la bôite. Les copépodes ont préféré aussi l’extrait de S. lomentaria à celui de E. compressa, peut-être en raison du contenu plus élevé en matière organique dissoute dans les premiers traitements. Les extraits des deux algues étaient préférés à leurs imitations, suggérant une réponse chimique (non visuelle) à la matière organique dissoute., The harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus was introduced into culture dishes containing either mimics, extract, or fragments of two macroalgae commonly found in the copepod’s supralittoral habitat: the tubular Enteromorpha compressa and the encrusting, Ralfsia-like alternate phase of Scytosiphon lomentaria in equal abundance. Natural and artificial food sources were offered equivalently with control substrata and the copepod’s position relative to each surface was recorded on videotape over a 12-hour period. The copepods preferred experimental treatments to controls immediately after introduction (within 1 hour) but favored the controls after 12 hours. This suggests either (1) a more random orientation after an initial feeding to relieve starvation; or (2) over time, dissolved organic material more fully permeated the water in each dish. The copepods also preferred the extract of S. lomentaria crust to that of E. compressa, perhaps due to a higher content of dissolved organic matter in the former treatments. Extracts of both algae were preferred over their respective mimics, suggesting a chemical (non-visual) response to dissolved organic matter.

Le copépode harpacticï ide Tigriopus californicus a été introduit dans des boîtes de culture contenant soit des imitations, soit un extrait, soit des fragments de deux macroalgues communément trouvées dans l’habitat supralittoral du copépode: l’algue tubulaire Enteromorpha compressa et l’algue incrustante, dans sa phase ressemblant à Ralfsia, Scytosiphon lomentaria, en quantités égales. Les nourritures naturelles et artificielles étaient offertes en quantités équivalentes avec un substrat témoin et la position du copépode sur chaque surface était enregistré sur bande vidéo sur une période de 12 heures. Les copépodes ont préféré les traitements expérimentaux aux témoins, dès leur introduction (pendant une heure), mais ont préféré les témoins après 12 heures. Ceci suggère soit (1) une orientation plus au hasard, après une alimentation initiale pour couper le jeûne; ou (2) le temps écoulé, la matière organique dissoute s’est répandue plus largement dans la bôite. Les copépodes ont préféré aussi l’extrait de S. lomentaria à celui de E. compressa, peut-être en raison du contenu plus élevé en matière organique dissoute dans les premiers traitements. Les extraits des deux algues étaient préférés à leurs imitations, suggérant une réponse chimique (non visuelle) à la matière organique dissoute.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854000504264
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854000504264
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854000504264
2000-02-01
2016-08-31

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation