Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Deep-water scalpellomorph/coral symbiosis (Cirripedia, Pedunculata/Hexacorallia, Scleractinia) in the North Atlantic

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[The heavily armored peduncles of four species of deep-water calanticid scalpellomorphs, from three distant localities across the North Atlantic, are partially overgrown by the branching scleractinian corals on which they had settled. We infer the association and overgrowths benefit the barnacles in isolating them from competitors and predators. These barnacles and their hosts represent relatively old groups (early Mesozoic and Paleogene, respectively) and therefore the relationship could have been established during their early radiation. Because the corals are capable of at least partially if not completely entombing the scaly remains of the peduncles when the barnacles die, recognizable traces of this symbiotic relationship are probably present in the fossil record.

Les pédoncules fortement écailleux de quatre espèces de scalpellomorphes calanticides d'eau profonde, provenant de trois stations de l'Atlantique Nord, sont partiellement recouverts par des coraux scléractiniaires sur lesquels ils se sont fixés. Nous en déduisons que l'association et le recouvrement profite à ces cirripèdes en les isolant de leurs compétiteurs et prédateurs. Ces cirripèdes et leurs hôtes font partie de groupes relativement anciens (Mésozoïque inférieur et Paléogène respectivement) et ainsi cette relation a pu être établie pendant leur radiation précoce. Le fait que ces coraux profonds soient capables, au moins en partie, si ce n'est complètement, d'enrober les restes écailleux des pédoncules lorsque le cirripède meurt, laisse à penser que des traces reconnaissables de cette relation symbiotique sont probablement présentes chez des fossiles., The heavily armored peduncles of four species of deep-water calanticid scalpellomorphs, from three distant localities across the North Atlantic, are partially overgrown by the branching scleractinian corals on which they had settled. We infer the association and overgrowths benefit the barnacles in isolating them from competitors and predators. These barnacles and their hosts represent relatively old groups (early Mesozoic and Paleogene, respectively) and therefore the relationship could have been established during their early radiation. Because the corals are capable of at least partially if not completely entombing the scaly remains of the peduncles when the barnacles die, recognizable traces of this symbiotic relationship are probably present in the fossil record.

Les pédoncules fortement écailleux de quatre espèces de scalpellomorphes calanticides d'eau profonde, provenant de trois stations de l'Atlantique Nord, sont partiellement recouverts par des coraux scléractiniaires sur lesquels ils se sont fixés. Nous en déduisons que l'association et le recouvrement profite à ces cirripèdes en les isolant de leurs compétiteurs et prédateurs. Ces cirripèdes et leurs hôtes font partie de groupes relativement anciens (Mésozoïque inférieur et Paléogène respectivement) et ainsi cette relation a pu être établie pendant leur radiation précoce. Le fait que ces coraux profonds soient capables, au moins en partie, si ce n'est complètement, d'enrober les restes écailleux des pédoncules lorsque le cirripède meurt, laisse à penser que des traces reconnaissables de cette relation symbiotique sont probablement présentes chez des fossiles.]

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854002760095561
2002-03-01
2015-08-29

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to email alerts
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation