Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

In situ observations of ovigerous Cancer pagurus Linnaeus, 1758 in Norwegian waters (Brachyura, Cancridae)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Crustaceana

[In northwestern Norway, a high density of half-buried individuals of Cancer pagurus was observed by SCUBA diving in February 2001, at 15-20 m depth on a substrate consisting of sand and stones. Sixteen of these crabs were ovigerous females. All hiding places were marked with numbered slates and the ovigerous females were tagged. The hide-outs were subsequently monitored during ten SCUBA-dives from 24 March to 16 September 2001. An ovigerous female taken into the laboratory had her young hatched by the end of July, indicating that the observed movements from the shelters in June through September may be due to the hatching of eggs. The study shows that not all ovigerous females migrate to deeper water to incubate their eggs. Suitable substrate and a good hiding place during incubation seem to be very important and the ovigerous females can stay in the same shelter from February/March until the eggs hatch in summer.

Au nord-ouest de la Norvège, une densité élevée de crabes Cancer pagurus à demi-enfouis a été observée au cours de plongées en février 2001, à 15-20 m de profondeur, sur un substrat de sable et de pierres. Seize de ces crabes étaient des femelles ovigères. Toutes les caches ont été marquées par des ardoises numérotées et les femelles ovigères étiquetées. Les caches ont été suivies durant dix plongées successives, effectuées entre le 24 mars et le 16 septembre 2001. Une femelle ovigère gardée en laboratoire a pondu finjuillet, indiquant que les mouvements observés dans les caches de juin à septembre étaient dus à la ponte des oeufs. Cette étude montre que toutes les femelles ovigères ne migrent pas vers des eaux plus profondes pour incuber leurs oeufs. Un substrat convenable et un bon abri pendant l'incubation semblent être très importants et les femelles ovigères peuvent rester dans le même abri de février-mars jusqu'à la ponte des oeufs en été., In northwestern Norway, a high density of half-buried individuals of Cancer pagurus was observed by SCUBA diving in February 2001, at 15-20 m depth on a substrate consisting of sand and stones. Sixteen of these crabs were ovigerous females. All hiding places were marked with numbered slates and the ovigerous females were tagged. The hide-outs were subsequently monitored during ten SCUBA-dives from 24 March to 16 September 2001. An ovigerous female taken into the laboratory had her young hatched by the end of July, indicating that the observed movements from the shelters in June through September may be due to the hatching of eggs. The study shows that not all ovigerous females migrate to deeper water to incubate their eggs. Suitable substrate and a good hiding place during incubation seem to be very important and the ovigerous females can stay in the same shelter from February/March until the eggs hatch in summer.

Au nord-ouest de la Norvège, une densité élevée de crabes Cancer pagurus à demi-enfouis a été observée au cours de plongées en février 2001, à 15-20 m de profondeur, sur un substrat de sable et de pierres. Seize de ces crabes étaient des femelles ovigères. Toutes les caches ont été marquées par des ardoises numérotées et les femelles ovigères étiquetées. Les caches ont été suivies durant dix plongées successives, effectuées entre le 24 mars et le 16 septembre 2001. Une femelle ovigère gardée en laboratoire a pondu finjuillet, indiquant que les mouvements observés dans les caches de juin à septembre étaient dus à la ponte des oeufs. Cette étude montre que toutes les femelles ovigères ne migrent pas vers des eaux plus profondes pour incuber leurs oeufs. Un substrat convenable et un bon abri pendant l'incubation semblent être très importants et les femelles ovigères peuvent rester dans le même abri de février-mars jusqu'à la ponte des oeufs en été.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854003322033861
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854003322033861
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854003322033861
2003-04-01
2016-12-11

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation