Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Macrohabitat partitioning among three crayfish species in two Missouri streams, U.S.A.

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Crustaceana

[We examined diurnal macrohabitat association patterns among three species of crayfish and two age classes within each species during two seasons in two Missouri Ozarks streams. Autumn quadrat samples were obtained during three years at Jacks Fork River and two years at Big Piney River; summer samples were taken for five years at both rivers. Samples were partitioned among five macrohabitat types (riffles, runs, pools, backwaters, and emergent vegetation patches). Orconectes luteus, O. ozarkae, and O. punctimanus were separated into young of year (YOY) and adults based on carapace length-frequency analysis. Relative use of macrohabitats by crayfish species and age classes was compared using ANOVA and least squares means probability difference analysis (LSMPDA). Orconectes luteus was the predominant species in both streams and was the most widespread among macrohabitats. Orconectes ozarkae used all macrohabitats, but showed an affinity for pools, backwaters, and vegetation patches. Orconectes punctimanus was the least common species and was largely restricted to vegetation patches and backwaters. We documented ontogenetic shifts in macrohabitat use in O. luteus and O. ozarkae. Although there were interspecific differences, YOY crayfish generally were concentrated in macrohabitats along shallow margins of streams. Several distribution patterns of crayfish species/age classes among macrohabitats showed consistency across temporal and spatial bounds. Study results have implications for lotic crayfish conservation and management.

Nous avons examiné les modèles d'association diurnes de macrohabitat chez trois espèces d'écrevisses et deux classes d'âge pour chaque espèce pendant deux saisons dans deux courants du Missouri Ozarks. Les échantillons de quadrats d'automne ont été obtenus pendant trois ans dans la Jacks Fork River et deux ans dans la Big Piney River; les échantillons d'été ont été prélevés pendant cinq ans dans les deux rivières. Les échantillonnages ont été répartis dans cinq types de macrohabitat (rapides, ruisseaux, mares, eaux morts, végétation émergée). Orconectes luteus, O. ozarkae, et O. punctimanus ont été répartis en jeunes de l'année (YOY) et en adultes à partir de l'analyse de la fréquence de longueur de la carapace. L'utilisation relative des macrohabitats par espèce d'écrevisse et par classe d'âge a été comparée par les tests ANOVA et LSMPDA. Orconectes luteus est l'espèce dominante dans les deux rivières et est la plus répandue parmi les macrohabitats. O. ozarkae utilise tous les macrohabitats, mais montre une affinité particulière pour les mares, les eaux mortes et la végétation émergée. O. punctimanus, l'espèce la moins commune, se limit à la végétation émergée et aux eaux mortes. Nous nous sommes intéressés aux changements ontogéniques dans l'utilisation des macrohabitats chez O. luteus et O. ozarkae. Bien qu'il y ait des différences interspécifiques, les écrevisses YOY sont généralement concentrées dans les habitats situés le long des bords peu profonds des rivières. Plusieurs modèles de distribution espèce d'écrevisse/classe d'âge se sont montrés cohérents dans des limites temporelles et spatiales. Les résultats de l'étude ont des implications utilisables pour la conservation et la gestion des écrevisses., We examined diurnal macrohabitat association patterns among three species of crayfish and two age classes within each species during two seasons in two Missouri Ozarks streams. Autumn quadrat samples were obtained during three years at Jacks Fork River and two years at Big Piney River; summer samples were taken for five years at both rivers. Samples were partitioned among five macrohabitat types (riffles, runs, pools, backwaters, and emergent vegetation patches). Orconectes luteus, O. ozarkae, and O. punctimanus were separated into young of year (YOY) and adults based on carapace length-frequency analysis. Relative use of macrohabitats by crayfish species and age classes was compared using ANOVA and least squares means probability difference analysis (LSMPDA). Orconectes luteus was the predominant species in both streams and was the most widespread among macrohabitats. Orconectes ozarkae used all macrohabitats, but showed an affinity for pools, backwaters, and vegetation patches. Orconectes punctimanus was the least common species and was largely restricted to vegetation patches and backwaters. We documented ontogenetic shifts in macrohabitat use in O. luteus and O. ozarkae. Although there were interspecific differences, YOY crayfish generally were concentrated in macrohabitats along shallow margins of streams. Several distribution patterns of crayfish species/age classes among macrohabitats showed consistency across temporal and spatial bounds. Study results have implications for lotic crayfish conservation and management.

Nous avons examiné les modèles d'association diurnes de macrohabitat chez trois espèces d'écrevisses et deux classes d'âge pour chaque espèce pendant deux saisons dans deux courants du Missouri Ozarks. Les échantillons de quadrats d'automne ont été obtenus pendant trois ans dans la Jacks Fork River et deux ans dans la Big Piney River; les échantillons d'été ont été prélevés pendant cinq ans dans les deux rivières. Les échantillonnages ont été répartis dans cinq types de macrohabitat (rapides, ruisseaux, mares, eaux morts, végétation émergée). Orconectes luteus, O. ozarkae, et O. punctimanus ont été répartis en jeunes de l'année (YOY) et en adultes à partir de l'analyse de la fréquence de longueur de la carapace. L'utilisation relative des macrohabitats par espèce d'écrevisse et par classe d'âge a été comparée par les tests ANOVA et LSMPDA. Orconectes luteus est l'espèce dominante dans les deux rivières et est la plus répandue parmi les macrohabitats. O. ozarkae utilise tous les macrohabitats, mais montre une affinité particulière pour les mares, les eaux mortes et la végétation émergée. O. punctimanus, l'espèce la moins commune, se limit à la végétation émergée et aux eaux mortes. Nous nous sommes intéressés aux changements ontogéniques dans l'utilisation des macrohabitats chez O. luteus et O. ozarkae. Bien qu'il y ait des différences interspécifiques, les écrevisses YOY sont généralement concentrées dans les habitats situés le long des bords peu profonds des rivières. Plusieurs modèles de distribution espèce d'écrevisse/classe d'âge se sont montrés cohérents dans des limites temporelles et spatiales. Les résultats de l'étude ont des implications utilisables pour la conservation et la gestion des écrevisses.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854003765911739
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854003765911739
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854003765911739
2003-03-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation