Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The role of size-selective predation in the displacement of Orconectes crayfishes following rusty crayfish invasion

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Crustaceana

[Selective predation can drive community composition. We designed a field study to determine if selective predation by fishes accounts for population dominance of the exotic rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, in a northern Wisconsin lake. We hypothesized that fish predators avoid consuming O. rusticus in favor of congeners O. propinquus and O. virilis because O. rusticus attains either superior size or is more aggressive than its congeners. Largely based on previous experimental work, we expected that predators would consume smaller individuals of rusty crayfish than of other species, as a result of behavioral differences among crayfish species. Although smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) consumed fewer rusty crayfish than expected based on relative prey abundance, predators consumed similar sized crayfish of all species. Further, our results indicated that predators likely avoid O. rusticus because they have larger chelae than congeners, and that behavioral differences did not appear to contribute substantially to crayfish selection at the whole lake scale. Our results suggest that selective predation based on chelae size is one of the primary drivers of this species replacement. Selective predation commonly accelerates exotic dominance over native prey and should be considered explicitly in exotic species investigations. La prédation sélective peut déterminer la composition d'une communauté. Nous avons organisé une étude de terrain pour déterminer si la prédation sélective par les poissons explique la dominance de la population d'écrevisse rustique, Orconectes rusticus, dans un lac du nord du Wisconsin. L'hypothèse initiale était que les poissons prédateurs évitent de consommer O. rusticus plutôt que ses congénères O. propinquus et O. virilis parce que O. rusticus, soit atteint une taille supérieure, soit est plus agressive que ses congénères. Sur la base d'un travail expérimental précédent, nous avons supposé que les prédateurs consommeraient des individus de l'écrevisse rustique petits plutôt que ceux d'autres espèces en raison des différences de comportement entre les espèces d'écrevisses. Bien que le blackbass à petite bouche (Micropterus dolomieu) et la perche jaune (Perca flavescens) aient consommé moins d'écrevisses rustiques que prévu en considérant l'abondance relative des proies, les prédateurs ont consommé les écrevisses de même taille des différentes espèces. De plus, nos résultats ont indiqué que les prédateurs évitent probablement O. rusticus parce qu'elles ont des pinces plus grandes que leurs congénères et que les différences de comportement ne semblent pas contribuer substantiellement à la sélection des écrevisses à l'échelle du lac étudié. Nos résultats suggèrent que la prédation sélective fondée sur la taille des pinces est le principal facteur du remplacement des espèces. La prédation sélective accélère habituellement la dominance des espèces exotiques par rapport aux espèces indigènes et devrait être davantage prise en compte dans les investigations sur les espèces exotiques., Selective predation can drive community composition. We designed a field study to determine if selective predation by fishes accounts for population dominance of the exotic rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, in a northern Wisconsin lake. We hypothesized that fish predators avoid consuming O. rusticus in favor of congeners O. propinquus and O. virilis because O. rusticus attains either superior size or is more aggressive than its congeners. Largely based on previous experimental work, we expected that predators would consume smaller individuals of rusty crayfish than of other species, as a result of behavioral differences among crayfish species. Although smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) consumed fewer rusty crayfish than expected based on relative prey abundance, predators consumed similar sized crayfish of all species. Further, our results indicated that predators likely avoid O. rusticus because they have larger chelae than congeners, and that behavioral differences did not appear to contribute substantially to crayfish selection at the whole lake scale. Our results suggest that selective predation based on chelae size is one of the primary drivers of this species replacement. Selective predation commonly accelerates exotic dominance over native prey and should be considered explicitly in exotic species investigations. La prédation sélective peut déterminer la composition d'une communauté. Nous avons organisé une étude de terrain pour déterminer si la prédation sélective par les poissons explique la dominance de la population d'écrevisse rustique, Orconectes rusticus, dans un lac du nord du Wisconsin. L'hypothèse initiale était que les poissons prédateurs évitent de consommer O. rusticus plutôt que ses congénères O. propinquus et O. virilis parce que O. rusticus, soit atteint une taille supérieure, soit est plus agressive que ses congénères. Sur la base d'un travail expérimental précédent, nous avons supposé que les prédateurs consommeraient des individus de l'écrevisse rustique petits plutôt que ceux d'autres espèces en raison des différences de comportement entre les espèces d'écrevisses. Bien que le blackbass à petite bouche (Micropterus dolomieu) et la perche jaune (Perca flavescens) aient consommé moins d'écrevisses rustiques que prévu en considérant l'abondance relative des proies, les prédateurs ont consommé les écrevisses de même taille des différentes espèces. De plus, nos résultats ont indiqué que les prédateurs évitent probablement O. rusticus parce qu'elles ont des pinces plus grandes que leurs congénères et que les différences de comportement ne semblent pas contribuer substantiellement à la sélection des écrevisses à l'échelle du lac étudié. Nos résultats suggèrent que la prédation sélective fondée sur la taille des pinces est le principal facteur du remplacement des espèces. La prédation sélective accélère habituellement la dominance des espèces exotiques par rapport aux espèces indigènes et devrait être davantage prise en compte dans les investigations sur les espèces exotiques.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1568540054286583
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/1568540054286583
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/1568540054286583
2005-03-01
2016-12-11

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation