Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Two Previously Unreported Barnacles Commensal with the Green Sea Turtle, Chelonia Mydas (Linnaeus, 1758), in Hawaii and a Comparison of their Attachment Modes

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[Two species of barnacles found living in the skin of green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, and not previously recorded in Hawaii are reported and their attachment mechanisms compared. These findings bring to five the total number of barnacles commensal with Hawaiian sea turtles and to 50 the number of shallow-water cirripedes known in Hawaii. Identified as Stomatolepas elegans and Platylepas decorata, both species live embedded in the soft skin of the limbs, neck, and tail of their host. Stomatolepas elegans is perhaps a recent arrival in Hawaii with this being the first report of it, or any member of the genus, occurring with hawksbill turtles, Eretmochelys imbricata. We found the barnacle embeds by penetrating the epidermis of sea turtles and then anchors in connective tissue of the dermis by way of small spikes extending from the shell. Conversely, P. decorata invades host tissue less deeply, lacks anchoring devices, and becomes encapsulated only by epidermis. Species diagnoses were made by light and scanning electron microscopy and by comparison with other members in each genus. Deux espèces de cirripèdes vivant dans la peau des tortues vertes marines Chelonia mydas et inconnues jusqu'à ce jour d'Hawaii sont étudiées et leur mécanismes de fixation comparés. Ces trouvailles portent à cinq le nombre total de cirripèdes commensaux des tortues marines d'Hawaii et à 50 le nombre d'espèces de cirripèdes d'eaux peu profondes connues à Hawaii. Identifiées comme Stomatolepas elegans et Platylepas decorata, les deux espèces vivent enfoncées dans la peau molle des membres, du cou et de la queue de leur hôte. Stomatolepas elegans est peut-être d'arrivée récente à Hawaii, ceci étant la première mention de sa présence, comme la première mention de ce genre, vivant avec les tortues imbriquées, Eretmochelys imbricata. Nous avons trouvé que le cirripède s'enfonce en pénétrant dans l'épiderme des tortues de mer et s'ancre ainsi dans le tissu conjonctif du derme au moyen de petites pointes venant de la coquille. Inversement, P. decorata envahit le tissuhôte moins profondément, n'a pas de système d'ancrage et s'encapsule seulement dans l'épiderme. Les diagnoses des espèces ont été effectuées à l'aide de la microscopie optique et de la microscopie électronique à balayage et par comparaison avec les autres membres de chaque genre., Two species of barnacles found living in the skin of green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, and not previously recorded in Hawaii are reported and their attachment mechanisms compared. These findings bring to five the total number of barnacles commensal with Hawaiian sea turtles and to 50 the number of shallow-water cirripedes known in Hawaii. Identified as Stomatolepas elegans and Platylepas decorata, both species live embedded in the soft skin of the limbs, neck, and tail of their host. Stomatolepas elegans is perhaps a recent arrival in Hawaii with this being the first report of it, or any member of the genus, occurring with hawksbill turtles, Eretmochelys imbricata. We found the barnacle embeds by penetrating the epidermis of sea turtles and then anchors in connective tissue of the dermis by way of small spikes extending from the shell. Conversely, P. decorata invades host tissue less deeply, lacks anchoring devices, and becomes encapsulated only by epidermis. Species diagnoses were made by light and scanning electron microscopy and by comparison with other members in each genus. Deux espèces de cirripèdes vivant dans la peau des tortues vertes marines Chelonia mydas et inconnues jusqu'à ce jour d'Hawaii sont étudiées et leur mécanismes de fixation comparés. Ces trouvailles portent à cinq le nombre total de cirripèdes commensaux des tortues marines d'Hawaii et à 50 le nombre d'espèces de cirripèdes d'eaux peu profondes connues à Hawaii. Identifiées comme Stomatolepas elegans et Platylepas decorata, les deux espèces vivent enfoncées dans la peau molle des membres, du cou et de la queue de leur hôte. Stomatolepas elegans est peut-être d'arrivée récente à Hawaii, ceci étant la première mention de sa présence, comme la première mention de ce genre, vivant avec les tortues imbriquées, Eretmochelys imbricata. Nous avons trouvé que le cirripède s'enfonce en pénétrant dans l'épiderme des tortues de mer et s'ancre ainsi dans le tissu conjonctif du derme au moyen de petites pointes venant de la coquille. Inversement, P. decorata envahit le tissuhôte moins profondément, n'a pas de système d'ancrage et s'encapsule seulement dans l'épiderme. Les diagnoses des espèces ont été effectuées à l'aide de la microscopie optique et de la microscopie électronique à balayage et par comparaison avec les autres membres de chaque genre.]

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854007782605547
2007-11-01
2015-04-28

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC 29409, U.S.A.;, Email: john.zardus@citadel.edu; 2: NOAA, National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, 2570 Dole St., Honolulu, HI 96822, U.S.A.

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to email alerts
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation