Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Bioluminescent emissions of the deep-water pandalid shrimp, Heterocarpus sibogae De Man, 1917 (Decapoda, Caridea, Pandalidae) under laboratory conditions

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Crustaceana

[Bioluminescent behaviour of deep-sea decapods is difficult to study under long-term laboratory maintenance, because most deep-sea organisms suffer from high mortality in such conditions. The objective of the present study was to determine the survival of the deep-water pandalid shrimp, Heterocarpus sibogae De Man, 1917 and its ability to produce bioluminescence when maintained in the laboratory. H. sibogae exhibited bioluminescence by emitting two streams of blue luminous secretions from the mouth when disturbed. The luminous material decayed rapidly and disappeared in seconds. Shrimps retreated from the luminous region immediately after secretion, suggesting that bioluminescence is a defence response. Under laboratory conditions, H. sibogae can produce luminous secretions for at least 43 days of maintenance. Maximum emission time was recorded in a non-ovigerous female that reached 634 seconds. Males and non-ovigerous females showed a similar average emission time of about 30 seconds. Ovigerous females, however, produced significantly longer emissions with an average of 103 seconds, suggesting that these may contain larger amounts of the key chemical for bioluminescence, coelenterazine, than males and non-ovigerous females do. Le comportement bioluminescent des crustacés marins profonds est difficile à étudier à long terme en laboratoire car la plupart des organismes marins profonds présentent de fortes mortalités sous ces conditions. L'objectif de cette étude a été de déterminer la survie de la crevette pandalidée profonde Heterocarpus sibogae De Man, 1917, et sa capacité à produire de la bioluminescence en conditions de laboratoire. H. sibogae produit une bioluminescence par l'émission par la bouche de deux jets de sécrétions bleues lumineuses lorsqu'elle est perturbée. Le matériel lumineux est rapidement décomposé et disparaît dans la seconde. Les crevettes fuient de la région luminescente immédiatement après la sécrétion, suggérant que la bioluminescence est une réponse de défense. Dans les conditions de laboratoire H. sibogae peut produire des sécrétions lumineuses pendant au moins 43 jours de maintenance. Le temps d'émission maximum, a été enregistré pour une femelle non ovigère et a atteint 634 secondes. Les mâles et les femelles non ovigères montrent un temps moyen d'émission comparable autour de 30 secondes. Les femelles ovigères cependant produisent des émissions significativement plus longues, avec une moyenne de 103 secondes, ce qui suggère qu'elles doivent contenir une plus grande quantité de coelenterazine, le composé clé de la bioluminescence, que les mâles ou les femelles non ovigères., Bioluminescent behaviour of deep-sea decapods is difficult to study under long-term laboratory maintenance, because most deep-sea organisms suffer from high mortality in such conditions. The objective of the present study was to determine the survival of the deep-water pandalid shrimp, Heterocarpus sibogae De Man, 1917 and its ability to produce bioluminescence when maintained in the laboratory. H. sibogae exhibited bioluminescence by emitting two streams of blue luminous secretions from the mouth when disturbed. The luminous material decayed rapidly and disappeared in seconds. Shrimps retreated from the luminous region immediately after secretion, suggesting that bioluminescence is a defence response. Under laboratory conditions, H. sibogae can produce luminous secretions for at least 43 days of maintenance. Maximum emission time was recorded in a non-ovigerous female that reached 634 seconds. Males and non-ovigerous females showed a similar average emission time of about 30 seconds. Ovigerous females, however, produced significantly longer emissions with an average of 103 seconds, suggesting that these may contain larger amounts of the key chemical for bioluminescence, coelenterazine, than males and non-ovigerous females do. Le comportement bioluminescent des crustacés marins profonds est difficile à étudier à long terme en laboratoire car la plupart des organismes marins profonds présentent de fortes mortalités sous ces conditions. L'objectif de cette étude a été de déterminer la survie de la crevette pandalidée profonde Heterocarpus sibogae De Man, 1917, et sa capacité à produire de la bioluminescence en conditions de laboratoire. H. sibogae produit une bioluminescence par l'émission par la bouche de deux jets de sécrétions bleues lumineuses lorsqu'elle est perturbée. Le matériel lumineux est rapidement décomposé et disparaît dans la seconde. Les crevettes fuient de la région luminescente immédiatement après la sécrétion, suggérant que la bioluminescence est une réponse de défense. Dans les conditions de laboratoire H. sibogae peut produire des sécrétions lumineuses pendant au moins 43 jours de maintenance. Le temps d'émission maximum, a été enregistré pour une femelle non ovigère et a atteint 634 secondes. Les mâles et les femelles non ovigères montrent un temps moyen d'émission comparable autour de 30 secondes. Les femelles ovigères cependant produisent des émissions significativement plus longues, avec une moyenne de 103 secondes, ce qui suggère qu'elles doivent contenir une plus grande quantité de coelenterazine, le composé clé de la bioluminescence, que les mâles ou les femelles non ovigères.]

Affiliations: 1: Research Center for Biodiversity, Academia Sinica, 128 section 2, Academia Road, Taipei 115, Taiwan, R.O.C.; 2: Institute of Marine Biology, National Taiwan Ocean University, 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 202, Taiwan, R.O.C.; 3: National Museum of Marine Science & Technology, Keelung, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854008783564064
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854008783564064
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854008783564064
2008-03-01
2016-12-04

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation