Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Movement Patterns of the Flagellar Exopods of the Maxillipeds in the Crayfish, Procambarus Cubensis (Decapoda, Astacidea)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[In the mouthparts of the crayfish, we find the flagellar exopods of the symmetrical 1st, 2nd, and 3rd maxillipeds, which do not participate in food processing but occasionally generate water currents by their repetitive beating. Earlier, we have observed and filmed the flagellar movements in freely behaving Procambarus cubensis reared in the laboratory, and suggested that these movements were an overt expression of the excited state of the crayfish. Recently, we used a high-speed scan camera (100-240 fps) to observe and document the flagellar movements in the tethered crayfish. Beating of all six flagella occurs with the same frequency (8.3-8.4 Hz). There is, however, an obvious phase shift between various ipsilateral and bilaterally symmetrical flagella. All right and left flagella can beat simultaneously, or only one side can be active. Each flagellum can stop for a short time, which, however, has no influence on the beating of the other flagella. Flagellar movements seen in slowly displayed video-movies are complex and variable in their trajectories, and each flagellum is moving in its own manner. It is suggested that each flagellum has its own central pattern generator, and that activation of all ipsilateral flagella concurrently is established by common higher commands. Dans la zone buccale de l'écrevisse se trouvent, en symétrie, les exopodites flagelliformes des maxillipèdes 1, 2 et 3, qui ne participent pas à l'alimentation, mais de temps en temps créent un courant d'eau par leur battement répété. Nous avons déjà observé et filmé leurs mouvements chez des Procambarus cubensis maintenues librement en élevage au laboratoire et suggéré que ces mouvements sont l'expression de l'état d'excitation de l'écrevisse. Récemment, nous avons utilisé une caméra ultra-sensible (100-240 fps) pour observer et préciser les mouvements chez des écrevisses entravées. Le battement des six flagelles se fait avec la même fréquence (8,3-8,4 Hz). Il y a cependant, une phase évidente de changement entre divers flagelles symétriques homolatéraux et bilatéraux. Tous les flagelles droits et gauches peuvent battre simultanément ou un seul côté peut être actif. Chaque flagelle peut s'arrêter pendant un petit moment, sans que cela ait une influence sur le battement des autres. Les mouvements flagellaires observés au ralenti sont complexes et variables dans leur trajectoire, et chaque flagelle bouge de sa propre façon. Il est suggéré que chaque flagelle a son propre centre de détermination, et que l'activation de tous les flagelles du même côté est établie par une commande supérieure commune., In the mouthparts of the crayfish, we find the flagellar exopods of the symmetrical 1st, 2nd, and 3rd maxillipeds, which do not participate in food processing but occasionally generate water currents by their repetitive beating. Earlier, we have observed and filmed the flagellar movements in freely behaving Procambarus cubensis reared in the laboratory, and suggested that these movements were an overt expression of the excited state of the crayfish. Recently, we used a high-speed scan camera (100-240 fps) to observe and document the flagellar movements in the tethered crayfish. Beating of all six flagella occurs with the same frequency (8.3-8.4 Hz). There is, however, an obvious phase shift between various ipsilateral and bilaterally symmetrical flagella. All right and left flagella can beat simultaneously, or only one side can be active. Each flagellum can stop for a short time, which, however, has no influence on the beating of the other flagella. Flagellar movements seen in slowly displayed video-movies are complex and variable in their trajectories, and each flagellum is moving in its own manner. It is suggested that each flagellum has its own central pattern generator, and that activation of all ipsilateral flagella concurrently is established by common higher commands. Dans la zone buccale de l'écrevisse se trouvent, en symétrie, les exopodites flagelliformes des maxillipèdes 1, 2 et 3, qui ne participent pas à l'alimentation, mais de temps en temps créent un courant d'eau par leur battement répété. Nous avons déjà observé et filmé leurs mouvements chez des Procambarus cubensis maintenues librement en élevage au laboratoire et suggéré que ces mouvements sont l'expression de l'état d'excitation de l'écrevisse. Récemment, nous avons utilisé une caméra ultra-sensible (100-240 fps) pour observer et préciser les mouvements chez des écrevisses entravées. Le battement des six flagelles se fait avec la même fréquence (8,3-8,4 Hz). Il y a cependant, une phase évidente de changement entre divers flagelles symétriques homolatéraux et bilatéraux. Tous les flagelles droits et gauches peuvent battre simultanément ou un seul côté peut être actif. Chaque flagelle peut s'arrêter pendant un petit moment, sans que cela ait une influence sur le battement des autres. Les mouvements flagellaires observés au ralenti sont complexes et variables dans leur trajectoire, et chaque flagelle bouge de sa propre façon. Il est suggéré que chaque flagelle a son propre centre de détermination, et que l'activation de tous les flagelles du même côté est établie par une commande supérieure commune.]

Affiliations: 1: Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Butlerova 5a, Moscow 117485, Russia;, Email: shuranova_z@mail.ru; 2: Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Bol'shoj Karetnyj 19, Moscow 127994, Russia

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854008x363731
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854008x363731
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854008x363731
2009-01-01
2016-09-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation