Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Conservation, status, and diversity of the crayfishes of the genus Cambarus Erichson, 1846 (Decapoda, Cambaridae)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[The crayfish genus Cambarus Erichson, 1846 contains 97 species found in a wide diversity of freshwater aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats in eastern and central regions of North America. The greatest diversity of this genus is found in the south-eastern areas of the United States, particularly in states such as Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and Alabama. About half (47.42%) of all Cambarus species are either endangered, threatened, or vulnerable. Therefore, these species require special attention from a conservation standpoint. Habitat destruction and degradation are the main threats to the species of Cambarus in general. Cambarus spp. living in caves are more likely to be endangered than species of the same genus found in surface waters or semi-terrestrial habitats. For the better part, species of this genus found in more than one type of habitat tend to have a conservation status that is currently stable. Many Cambarus species have relatively small ranges, and 43.30% of all Cambarus spp. are restricted to only one U.S. state. The information available about distribution, habitat, and conservation status of the species of Cambarus is reviewed in order to raise awareness about these very diverse crayfishes, and to assist potential conservation efforts. Le genre d'écrevisse Cambarus Erichson, 1846 contient 97 espèces trouvées dans une large diversité d'habitats dulcicoles aquatiques et semi-aquatiques dans les régions orientale et centrale d'Amérique du Nord. La plus grande diversité de ce genre est trouvée dans les régions sud-orientales des États-Unis, en particulier dans les états comme le Tennessee, la Géorgie, la Caroline du Nord, et l'Alabama. Environ la moitié (47,42%) de toutes les espèces de Cambarus sont soit en danger, soit menacées ou vulnérables. En conséquence, ces espèces requièrent une attention particulière du point de vue de la conservation. La destruction et la dégradation de l'habitat sont les principales menaces pour les espèces de Cambarus en général. Les espèces de Cambarus vivant dans les grottes sont vraisemblablement plus en danger que les espèces du même genre trouvées dans les eaux de surface ou dans les habitats semi-terrestres. Habituellement, les espèces de ce genre trouvées dans plus d'un type d'habitat tendent à avoir un statut de conservation qui est actuellement stable. Beaucoup d'espèces de Cambarus ont des aires de répartition relativement petites, et 43,30% de tous les Cambarus sont présents dans seulement un état des États-Unis. L'information disponible sur la répartition, l'habitat et le statut de conservation des espèces de Cambarus est passée en revue afin de donner tous les renseignements sur ces différentes écrevisses, et d'aider les efforts de conservation potentiels., The crayfish genus Cambarus Erichson, 1846 contains 97 species found in a wide diversity of freshwater aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats in eastern and central regions of North America. The greatest diversity of this genus is found in the south-eastern areas of the United States, particularly in states such as Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and Alabama. About half (47.42%) of all Cambarus species are either endangered, threatened, or vulnerable. Therefore, these species require special attention from a conservation standpoint. Habitat destruction and degradation are the main threats to the species of Cambarus in general. Cambarus spp. living in caves are more likely to be endangered than species of the same genus found in surface waters or semi-terrestrial habitats. For the better part, species of this genus found in more than one type of habitat tend to have a conservation status that is currently stable. Many Cambarus species have relatively small ranges, and 43.30% of all Cambarus spp. are restricted to only one U.S. state. The information available about distribution, habitat, and conservation status of the species of Cambarus is reviewed in order to raise awareness about these very diverse crayfishes, and to assist potential conservation efforts. Le genre d'écrevisse Cambarus Erichson, 1846 contient 97 espèces trouvées dans une large diversité d'habitats dulcicoles aquatiques et semi-aquatiques dans les régions orientale et centrale d'Amérique du Nord. La plus grande diversité de ce genre est trouvée dans les régions sud-orientales des États-Unis, en particulier dans les états comme le Tennessee, la Géorgie, la Caroline du Nord, et l'Alabama. Environ la moitié (47,42%) de toutes les espèces de Cambarus sont soit en danger, soit menacées ou vulnérables. En conséquence, ces espèces requièrent une attention particulière du point de vue de la conservation. La destruction et la dégradation de l'habitat sont les principales menaces pour les espèces de Cambarus en général. Les espèces de Cambarus vivant dans les grottes sont vraisemblablement plus en danger que les espèces du même genre trouvées dans les eaux de surface ou dans les habitats semi-terrestres. Habituellement, les espèces de ce genre trouvées dans plus d'un type d'habitat tendent à avoir un statut de conservation qui est actuellement stable. Beaucoup d'espèces de Cambarus ont des aires de répartition relativement petites, et 43,30% de tous les Cambarus sont présents dans seulement un état des États-Unis. L'information disponible sur la répartition, l'habitat et le statut de conservation des espèces de Cambarus est passée en revue afin de donner tous les renseignements sur ces différentes écrevisses, et d'aider les efforts de conservation potentiels.]

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854009x407722
2009-06-01
2015-07-05

Affiliations: 1: Environmental and Health Studies Programme, Department of Multidisciplinary Studies, Glendon College, York University, 2275 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M6, Canada

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to email alerts
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation