Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

[A New Genus and Species of Barnacle (Cirripedia, Pedunculata) Commensal with Arca Navicularis Bruguière, 1789 (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Arcoidea) from Queensland, Australia, with an Analysis of the Relationship, A New Genus and Species of Barnacle (Cirripedia, Pedunculata) Commensal with Arca Navicularis Bruguière, 1789 (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Arcoidea) from Queensland, Australia, with an Analysis of the Relationship]

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[A previously undescribed heteralepadomorph genus and species is recorded as attached to the inside of the shell of the living epibenthic bivalve Arca navicularis, dredged from the waters of Moreton Bay, Queensland. The combination of anatomical features exhibited by the barnacle match some of the characteristics of Malacolepas. However, several characters are distinctive and a new genus and species is, therefore, proposed and named Arcalepas brucei sp. nov.

Occurring in groups of up to ten individuals inside each host, Arcalepas brucei sp. nov. clearly benefits from the protection afforded by inhabiting the living bivalve and the flow of oxygenated water created by Arca navicularis. However, the barnacle also exploits the ciliary rejection currents of its host and appears to collect the pseudofaeces the bivalve removes from its mantle cavity along the rejectory tracts that internally occupy each ventral mantle margin. It does this by expanding its cirral net into the rejectory tracts and plucking up the unwanted particles collected by the suspension feeding activities of the bivalve. The barnacle's relationship with its host is thus best described as commensal. This is the first record of such an association from Australian waters. Eine bisher unbeschriebene Gattung und Art einer heteralepadomorphen Seepocke wird hier von der Schaleninnenseite einer lebenden epibenthischen Muschel (Arca navicularis) von Moreton Bay, Queensland (Australien) beschrieben. Die Kombination einiger anatomischer Merkmale dieser Seepocke stimmt mit Besonderheiten von Malacolepas überein. Allerdings besitzt die neue Art charakteristische Merkmale, die die Beschreibung einer neuen Gattung rechtfertigen.

In Gruppen bis zu zehn Individuen besiedelt Arcalepas brucei gen. und sp. nov. ihren Wirt, in dem sie nicht nur Schutz findet, sondern auch vom Strom sauerstoffreichen Wassers profitiert, der von Arca navicularis erzeugt wird. Die Seepocke nutzt die dem Abtransport des Abfalls dienenden Wimperströme des Wirtes, indem sie ihnen Pseudofaeces entnimmt, die die Muschel aus der Mantelhöhle entlang von Wimperbahnen entfernt, die innen auf den ventralen Mantelrändern verlaufen. In diese Wimperbahnen hält die Seepocke ihre Zirren und bedient sich an dem von der Muschel verschmähten Material, das während ihrer Nahrungsaufnahme ausgesondert wird. Die Beziehung zwischen Seepocke und Muschel ist daher am besten als kommensal zu bezeichnen und ist bis jetzt die einzige Beziehung dieser Art, die von australischen Gewässern bekannt ist.
, A previously undescribed heteralepadomorph genus and species is recorded as attached to the inside of the shell of the living epibenthic bivalve Arca navicularis, dredged from the waters of Moreton Bay, Queensland. The combination of anatomical features exhibited by the barnacle match some of the characteristics of Malacolepas. However, several characters are distinctive and a new genus and species is, therefore, proposed and named Arcalepas brucei sp. nov.

Occurring in groups of up to ten individuals inside each host, Arcalepas brucei sp. nov. clearly benefits from the protection afforded by inhabiting the living bivalve and the flow of oxygenated water created by Arca navicularis. However, the barnacle also exploits the ciliary rejection currents of its host and appears to collect the pseudofaeces the bivalve removes from its mantle cavity along the rejectory tracts that internally occupy each ventral mantle margin. It does this by expanding its cirral net into the rejectory tracts and plucking up the unwanted particles collected by the suspension feeding activities of the bivalve. The barnacle's relationship with its host is thus best described as commensal. This is the first record of such an association from Australian waters. Eine bisher unbeschriebene Gattung und Art einer heteralepadomorphen Seepocke wird hier von der Schaleninnenseite einer lebenden epibenthischen Muschel (Arca navicularis) von Moreton Bay, Queensland (Australien) beschrieben. Die Kombination einiger anatomischer Merkmale dieser Seepocke stimmt mit Besonderheiten von Malacolepas überein. Allerdings besitzt die neue Art charakteristische Merkmale, die die Beschreibung einer neuen Gattung rechtfertigen.

In Gruppen bis zu zehn Individuen besiedelt Arcalepas brucei gen. und sp. nov. ihren Wirt, in dem sie nicht nur Schutz findet, sondern auch vom Strom sauerstoffreichen Wassers profitiert, der von Arca navicularis erzeugt wird. Die Seepocke nutzt die dem Abtransport des Abfalls dienenden Wimperströme des Wirtes, indem sie ihnen Pseudofaeces entnimmt, die die Muschel aus der Mantelhöhle entlang von Wimperbahnen entfernt, die innen auf den ventralen Mantelrändern verlaufen. In diese Wimperbahnen hält die Seepocke ihre Zirren und bedient sich an dem von der Muschel verschmähten Material, das während ihrer Nahrungsaufnahme ausgesondert wird. Die Beziehung zwischen Seepocke und Muschel ist daher am besten als kommensal zu bezeichnen und ist bis jetzt die einzige Beziehung dieser Art, die von australischen Gewässern bekannt ist.
]

Affiliations: 1: The Western Australian Museum, Kew Street, Welshpool, Western Australia 6106, Australia;, Email: diana.jones@museum.wa.gov.au; 2: Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5DZ, U.K.; ; prof_bsmorton@hotmail.co.uk, Email: prof_bsmorton@hotmail.com

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Create email alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation