Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access The parasite Sacculina carcini Thompson, 1836 (Cirripedia, Rhizocephala) in the crab Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758) (Decapoda, Portunidae): influence of environmental conditions, colour morphotype and sex

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The parasite Sacculina carcini Thompson, 1836 (Cirripedia, Rhizocephala) in the crab Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758) (Decapoda, Portunidae): influence of environmental conditions, colour morphotype and sex

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Crustaceana

Parasitism is increasingly recognized as an important factor that can influence the structure and function of natural communities. The presence of externae of the parasite Sacculina carcini Thompson, 1836 was investigated in a population of the crab Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758) from the Mondego estuary, Portugal. A seasonal pattern of the S. carcini externae presence was observed with the highest values recorded in winter and the lowest in summer, ranging from 0.6 to 10%. The parasite seems to affect more females than males and the red morphotype presented higher prevalence than the green one. The size class [25, 35 mm[ was the one with the highest prevalence. The mouth of the estuary was the area where the most externally sacculinized crabs were caught. Apparently, the presence of the parasite tends to promote crabs migration to the mouth. This area coincides with the preferential spawning local of non-parasitized females. The infection by S. carcini influences the crab’s demography and its life history.

Affiliations: 1: 1CFE – Centre for Functional Ecology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Apartado 3046, P-3001-401 Coimbra, Portugal; 2: 2IMAR – Institute of Marine Research, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, P-3004-517 Coimbra, Portugal

Parasitism is increasingly recognized as an important factor that can influence the structure and function of natural communities. The presence of externae of the parasite Sacculina carcini Thompson, 1836 was investigated in a population of the crab Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758) from the Mondego estuary, Portugal. A seasonal pattern of the S. carcini externae presence was observed with the highest values recorded in winter and the lowest in summer, ranging from 0.6 to 10%. The parasite seems to affect more females than males and the red morphotype presented higher prevalence than the green one. The size class [25, 35 mm[ was the one with the highest prevalence. The mouth of the estuary was the area where the most externally sacculinized crabs were caught. Apparently, the presence of the parasite tends to promote crabs migration to the mouth. This area coincides with the preferential spawning local of non-parasitized females. The infection by S. carcini influences the crab’s demography and its life history.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/15685403/86/1/15685403_086_01_S03_text.html;jsessionid=cJuPT6-BbdK5uGFUW3Ve3yjV.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/15685403-00003150&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/15685403-00003150
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15685403-00003150
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15685403-00003150
2013-01-01
2016-12-03

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation