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Full Access Data on reproduction and fecundity of Processa bermudensis (Rankin, 1900) (Caridea, Processidae) from the southern coast of Quintana Roo, Mexico

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Data on reproduction and fecundity of Processa bermudensis (Rankin, 1900) (Caridea, Processidae) from the southern coast of Quintana Roo, Mexico

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The aim of the present study was to provide data on reproductive aspects of Processa bermudensis (Rankin, 1900), such as sex ratio, embryo size and volume, fecundity and brood loss. Shrimps were collected with a Coleman-Seagrove sledge net with 800 μm mesh on Thalassia testudinum Banks & Solander ex König meadows in Mahahual reef lagoon, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The sample of 2720 specimens had a sex ratio of 0.40 males per female. The carapace length of ovigerous females varied from 2.40 mm to 6.50 mm. Average fecundity of ovigerous females with embryos at first stage of development was 176.80 ± 136.64 embryos per female (range 39-753). There was a positive correlation between number of embryos and carapace length, but fecundity also varied in females within the same size class. Average embryo length was 0.39 ± 0.028 mm during the early stage of development, and 0.50 ± 0.029 mm in the late stage. The average volume increased by 89.5% (from 0.019 ± 0.003 mm3 to 0.036 ± 0.005 mm3). Embryo loss during development was 9.4%, and was independent of female size. To our knowledge this is the first study on the reproductive biology for any member of the Processidae on the Atlantic coast of Mexico.

Affiliations: 1: Laboratorio de Carcinoparasitología, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Apartado Postal 70-305, Mexico, D.F. 04510, Mexico

The aim of the present study was to provide data on reproductive aspects of Processa bermudensis (Rankin, 1900), such as sex ratio, embryo size and volume, fecundity and brood loss. Shrimps were collected with a Coleman-Seagrove sledge net with 800 μm mesh on Thalassia testudinum Banks & Solander ex König meadows in Mahahual reef lagoon, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The sample of 2720 specimens had a sex ratio of 0.40 males per female. The carapace length of ovigerous females varied from 2.40 mm to 6.50 mm. Average fecundity of ovigerous females with embryos at first stage of development was 176.80 ± 136.64 embryos per female (range 39-753). There was a positive correlation between number of embryos and carapace length, but fecundity also varied in females within the same size class. Average embryo length was 0.39 ± 0.028 mm during the early stage of development, and 0.50 ± 0.029 mm in the late stage. The average volume increased by 89.5% (from 0.019 ± 0.003 mm3 to 0.036 ± 0.005 mm3). Embryo loss during development was 9.4%, and was independent of female size. To our knowledge this is the first study on the reproductive biology for any member of the Processidae on the Atlantic coast of Mexico.

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/content/journals/10.1163/15685403-00003152
2013-01-01
2016-12-10

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