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Morphological adaptations to anchialine environments in species of five shrimp families (Barbouria yanezi, Agostocaris bozanici, Procaris mexicana, Calliasmata nohochi and Typhlatya pearsei)

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Anchialine systems are unusual among aquatic habitats in that they are subterranean karst systems in which marine and overlying groundwater are separated by distinct haloclines and characterized by high sulphur content, darkness and low nutrient availability. In this study, we examine how the antennulae, antennae, eyes and integument morphology of five anchialine species of decapods (Barbouria yanezi, Agostocaris bozanici, Procaris mexicana, Calliasmata nohochi and Typhlatya pearsei) are adapted for anchialine environments. Our examination of sensorial structures shows that while these species appear to have convergent adaptations for anchialine environments, degrees of specialization in antennular and antennal structures vary, with Barbouria yanezi showing the greatest setation. The eyes of all five species show pores at their tips, but only Calliasmata nohochi also exhibits setae on the eyes. We propose that these additional setae and pores function to enhance the ability of these decapods to sense mechanical and chemical stimuli in the water. In overview, these anchialine crustaceans have evolved anatomical/morphological attributes that appear to function to help detect predators, congeners, food, or refugia.

Affiliations: 1: 1Biospeleology and Carcinology Lab., Universidad de Quintana Roo – Cozumel (UQROO – Cozumel), División de Desarrollo Sustentable Departamento, Ciencias y Humanidades, Avenida Andrés Quintana Roo s/n, Cozumel 77640, Quintana Roo, Mexico; 2: 2Evolutionary Biology and Population Genetics Lab., Universidad de Quintana Roo – Cozumel (UQROO – Cozumel), División de Desarrollo Sustentable Departamento, Ciencias y Humanidades, Avenida Andrés Quintana Roo s/n, Cozumel 77640, Quintana Roo, Mexico; 3: 3Department of Integrative Biology, University of California Berkeley, 1101 Valley Life Science Building, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.; 4: 4School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom and Marine Biological Association of U.K., Plymouth, U.K.; 5: 5Posgrado en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, UNAM, Mexico City, DF, Mexico

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/content/journals/10.1163/15685403-00003197
2013-01-01
2016-12-10

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