Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Oxygen Consumption in a Brackish Water Crustacean, Sesarma Pli Cat Um (Latreille) and a Marine Crustacean, Lepas Anserifera L

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Crustaceana

[Der Sauerstoffverbrauch des Brackwasserkrebses Sesarma plicatum wurde ermittelt in Leitungswasser, sowie in 25%, 50%, 75% und 100% Meerwasser (Mw). Der Sauerstoffverbrauch war am geringsten in 50% Mw (dem natürlichen Medium des Versuchstieres) und stieg an in Salzgehalten über oder unter 50% mit Maximalwerten im Leitungswasser. Kleinere Individuen zeigten einen stärkeren Anstieg im Sauerstoffverbrauch nach Veränderung des Salzgehaltes als grössere. Lepas anserifera, ein mariner Cirripedier, wurde in ähnlicher Weise untersucht, und zwar in 25%. 50%, 75%, 100%, 125% und 150% Mw. In 25% und in 150% wurden abnormal niedrige Respirationswerte erhalten und die Versuchstiere starben schliesslich. Innerhalb der anderen Salzgehaltsstufen (50 bis 125% Mw) war der Sauerstoffverbrauch am niedrigsten in 100% Mw (dem natürlichen Medium des Cirripediers). Der Verbrauch erhöhte oder erniedrigte sich mit steigendem (125% Mw) oder fallendem (75%; 50% Mw) Salzgehalt. Diese Veränderungen der Stoffwechselintensität in verschiedenen Salzgehalten werden gedeutet als Stoffwechselkompensationen: die Versuchstiere zeigen den geringsten Sauerstoffverbrauch in ihrem natürlichen Medium., Der Sauerstoffverbrauch des Brackwasserkrebses Sesarma plicatum wurde ermittelt in Leitungswasser, sowie in 25%, 50%, 75% und 100% Meerwasser (Mw). Der Sauerstoffverbrauch war am geringsten in 50% Mw (dem natürlichen Medium des Versuchstieres) und stieg an in Salzgehalten über oder unter 50% mit Maximalwerten im Leitungswasser. Kleinere Individuen zeigten einen stärkeren Anstieg im Sauerstoffverbrauch nach Veränderung des Salzgehaltes als grössere. Lepas anserifera, ein mariner Cirripedier, wurde in ähnlicher Weise untersucht, und zwar in 25%. 50%, 75%, 100%, 125% und 150% Mw. In 25% und in 150% wurden abnormal niedrige Respirationswerte erhalten und die Versuchstiere starben schliesslich. Innerhalb der anderen Salzgehaltsstufen (50 bis 125% Mw) war der Sauerstoffverbrauch am niedrigsten in 100% Mw (dem natürlichen Medium des Cirripediers). Der Verbrauch erhöhte oder erniedrigte sich mit steigendem (125% Mw) oder fallendem (75%; 50% Mw) Salzgehalt. Diese Veränderungen der Stoffwechselintensität in verschiedenen Salzgehalten werden gedeutet als Stoffwechselkompensationen: die Versuchstiere zeigen den geringsten Sauerstoffverbrauch in ihrem natürlichen Medium.]

Affiliations: 1: Department of Zoology, Sir Theagaraya College, Madras-21, India; 2: Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854062x00085
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854062x00085
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854062x00085
1962-01-01
2017-01-19

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation