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Host suitability of vetiver grass to Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica

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Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are economically important pathogens of many agricultural crops, and the frequency of occurrence, abundance and importance of these nematodes in resource-poor agricultural production systems make control necessary. The host suitability of vetiver grass to Meloidogyne javanica and M. incognita race 2 was investigated and compared with the host status of the six crops included in the North Carolina Differential Host Range Test, i.e., tomato (cv. Rutgers), groundnut (cv. Florunner), watermelon (cv. Charleston Gray), green pepper (cv. California Wonder), cotton (cv. Deltapine) and tobacco (line NC 95). Each plant was inoculated with 10 000±500 eggs and second-stage juveniles (J2) of either M. javanica or M. incognita race 2, 3 weeks after emergence. Nematode reproduction assessments were done 56 days after inoculation. Significant differences in egg-laying female (ELF) indices, number of egg-masses and eggs and J2 per root system and reproduction factor (RF) values were recorded among the crops for both nematode species. Vetiver grass exhibited RF-values lower than 1 for both M. javanica and M. incognita race 2, indicating resistance to these root-knot nematode species.

Affiliations: 1: ARC–Grain Crops Institute, Private Bag X1251, 2520 Potchefstroom, South Africa; 2: National Department of Agriculture, Private Bag X258, 0001 Pretoria, South Africa; 3: ARC–Grain Crops Institute, Private Bag X1251, 2520 Potchefstroom, South Africa; School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom, South Africa; 4: School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom, South Africa; Laboratory of Tropical Crop Improvement, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Catholic University of Leuven (K.U. Leuven), Kasteelpark Arenberg 13, 3001 Leuven, Belgium

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/content/journals/10.1163/156854107779969736
2007-02-01
2016-12-05

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