Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The influence of host and temperature on the vertical migration of Pratylenchus penetrans

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Nematology
For more content, see Nematologica.

The influence of both host and temperature on the vertical migration of Pratylenchus penetrans was examined in a series of experiments using maize, carrot, black salsify, pea, bean and potato. Plants were grown in a pot placed on top of a plastic pipe of variable length in a growth chamber. This pipe was planted into a second pot to maintain the humidity in the pipe. Nematodes were inoculated at the bottom of the pipe and were allowed to migrate upwards for 14 days after which the pipe was cut into 5 cm sectors from which the nematodes were extracted and counted. More nematodes migrated at 21°C than at 16 or 11°C. Migration of P. penetrans towards a host decreased with increasing distance between the nematodes and all hosts, with maize and bean eliciting the most attraction. They were the only hosts able to stimulate nematode migration up to the distal end of 31 cm pipes. Potato and carrot were the least influential hosts. Hosts differently influenced the migration only of second-stage juveniles (J2), with a greater percentage of J2 moving under maize and bean than under carrot. Under all hosts, adults migrated in greater proportions with increasing distance than did other stages. The attractiveness of hosts was age dependent. Generally, infectivity decreased with distance travelled by the nematode.

Affiliations: 1: Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research, Crop Protection, Burg. Van Gansberghelaan 96, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium; Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium; 2: Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research, Crop Protection, Burg. Van Gansberghelaan 96, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854107781351963
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156854107781351963
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156854107781351963
2007-05-01
2016-12-05

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Nematology — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation