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Effect of rotation crops on hatch, viability and development of Heterodera glycines

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For more content, see Nematologica.

Rotation with non-host crops can be an effective method for reducing soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) populations in soybean cropping systems. Sunn hemp, Illinois bundleflower, oilseed rape, perennial ryegrass, red clover, corn and H. glycines-susceptible soybean were compared for their effects on H. glycines hatch, viability and development in laboratory and glasshouse experiments. In the laboratory experiments, root exudates in soil leachates, extracts from fresh plant tissues, and extracts from residues of sunn hemp, red clover and soybean stimulated hatch of second-stage juveniles (J2) of H. glycines. All crops appeared to contain hatch inhibitors as well. There was no apparent effect of the root exudates and extracts from any of the crops on egg viability in vitro. When the H. glycines J2 were exposed to root exudates and extracts for 72 h, only the extracts of fresh plants and plant residue from sunn hemp, red clover and soybean, and the extract of plant residue from oilseed rape reduced viability of J2. In glasshouse experiments, residues of all crops, except Illinois bundleflower, reduced egg population density, with sunn hemp providing the greatest reduction. Residues of sunn hemp, red clover, and perennial ryegrass added to soil reduced the reproduction factor, suggesting the residues not only reduced egg population density but also reduced nematode infectivity. While all crops allowed penetration by J2, minimal development (to third- or fourth-stage juveniles only) occurred only in sunn hemp, red clover, oilseed rape and Illinois bundleflower, and full development occurred only in soybean. The results suggest that sunn hemp and red clover were the most effective rotation crops for managing H. glycines, and that stimulating hatch of H. glycines J2 was the main mechanism involved in reducing the H. glycines population density.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA; 2: Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA, Southern Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota, Waseca, MN 56093, USA;, Email: chenx099@umn.edu; 3: Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA; 4: Southern Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota, Waseca, MN 56093, USA, Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA

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/content/journals/10.1163/156854108786161391
2008-11-01
2017-05-24

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