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Endophytic bacteria from Ethiopian coffee plants and their potential to antagonise Meloidogyne incognita

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Endophytic bacteria were isolated from coffee roots in Ethiopia and identified by Fatty Acid Methyl Ester-Gas Chromatography (FAME-GC). A total of 201 and 114 endophytic bacteria were isolated and identified during the wet and dry seasons, respectively. The most abundant genera were Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Agrobacterium, Stenotrophomonas and Enterobacter. Population densities were higher during the wet season than the dry season ranging from 5.2 × 103 to 2.07 × 106 cfu (g fresh root weight)–1. Culture filtrates of the bacterial isolates showed nematicidal effects of between 38 and 98%. The most active strains were Agrobacterium radiobacter, Bacillus pumilus, B. brevis, B. megaterium, B. mycoides, B. licheniformis, Chryseobacterium balustinum, Cedecea davisae, Cytophaga johnsonae, Lactobacillus paracasei, Micrococcus luteus, M. halobius, Pseudomonas syringae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Bacillus pumilus and B. mycoides were most effective in reducing the number of galls and egg masses caused by M. incognita by 33 and 39%, respectively.

Affiliations: 1: University of Bonn, Institute for Crop Sciences and Resource Conservation, INRES, Department of Plant Pathology, Research Unit Nematology in Soil Ecosystems, Nussallee 9, 53115 Bonn, Germany, Federal Biological Research Center for Agriculture and Forestry, Institute for Nematology and Vertebrate Research, Toppheideweg 88, 48161 Münster, Germany;, Email: tmekete@yahoo.com; 2: Federal Biological Research Center for Agriculture and Forestry, Institute for Nematology and Vertebrate Research, Toppheideweg 88, 48161 Münster, Germany; 3: Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil, ACW, Research Station ACW, Plant Protection, Ecotoxicology and Soil Zoology, P.O. Box 185, 8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland; 4: University of Bonn, Institute for Crop Sciences and Resource Conservation, INRES, Department of Plant Pathology, Research Unit Nematology in Soil Ecosystems, Nussallee 9, 53115 Bonn, Germany

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/content/journals/10.1163/156854108x398462
2009-01-01
2016-12-04

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