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Full Access Differential defence response due to jasmonate seed treatment in cowpea and tomato against root-knot and potato cyst nematodes

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Differential defence response due to jasmonate seed treatment in cowpea and tomato against root-knot and potato cyst nematodes

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Treatment of seeds with jasmonate provides significant reduction in Meloidogyne incognita and Globodera pallida infection. The number of M. incognita inside roots of cowpea and tomato plants derived from seeds treated with jasmonate was greatly reduced; however, the major effect of jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments was observed on the number of eggs produced by the nematodes wherein a significant reduction was observed in both treatments. By contrast, pre-treatment of tomato seeds with jasmonate not only reduced G. pallida infection by 63% but also affected nematode development inside the roots. These results indicate that jasmonate treatments affected nematode reproduction and/or development. We show here that germination and plant growth parameters of tomato seeds, but not of cowpea and soybean seeds, were unaffected by jasmonate treatment. The use of elicitors to prime plant immunity is a natural way of protecting plants by boosting their immunity to provide nematode resistance. Seed treatment with natural elicitors of plant immunity offers an environmentally friendly alternative for farmers and growers that can contribute to the protection of their crops from pests above and below ground.

Affiliations: 1: 1Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK; 2: 2Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-110 012, India

Treatment of seeds with jasmonate provides significant reduction in Meloidogyne incognita and Globodera pallida infection. The number of M. incognita inside roots of cowpea and tomato plants derived from seeds treated with jasmonate was greatly reduced; however, the major effect of jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments was observed on the number of eggs produced by the nematodes wherein a significant reduction was observed in both treatments. By contrast, pre-treatment of tomato seeds with jasmonate not only reduced G. pallida infection by 63% but also affected nematode development inside the roots. These results indicate that jasmonate treatments affected nematode reproduction and/or development. We show here that germination and plant growth parameters of tomato seeds, but not of cowpea and soybean seeds, were unaffected by jasmonate treatment. The use of elicitors to prime plant immunity is a natural way of protecting plants by boosting their immunity to provide nematode resistance. Seed treatment with natural elicitors of plant immunity offers an environmentally friendly alternative for farmers and growers that can contribute to the protection of their crops from pests above and below ground.

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/content/journals/10.1163/156854112x641754
2013-01-01
2017-08-21

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