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ACUTE STRESS SYNDROME OF THE YELLOW EUROPEAN EEL (ANGUILLA ANGUILLA LINNAEUS) WHEN EXPOSED TO A GRADED SWIMMING-LOAD

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For more content, see Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie (Vol 1-17) and Animal Biology (Vol 53 and onwards).

In a Blazka swim tunnel (length 170.0 cm; outer diameter swim-tunnel tube 28.8 cm and an inner diameter of 19.0 cm) short-term swim experiments with groups of 120 g eel (≈40 cm) at different swimming velocities varying from 0.25 to 3 body lengths (BL) per second were performed. In these experiments, substrates (FFA, glucose), the stress hormone cortisol, parameters from the ionic balance (sodium, potassium and chloride) and lactic acid were measured in the blood plasma at 0 (control group), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 BL/sec. It is concluded that a swimming speed up to 2 BL/sec is not stressful for yellow eel because the ionic balance is maintained, there is no evidence for activation of the pituitary-interrenal axis and the anaerobic metabolism is not activated. However swimming performances above 2 BL/sec showed a dichotomous pattern: some animals showed no changes while others showed the 'acute stress syndrome' resulting in elevated cortisol levels, glucose mobilisation, ionic imbalance and lactate accumulation. Based on these observations it can be concluded that eel-like (anguilliform) swimming is more suitable for long term sustained swimming than for burst activity.

10.1163/156854202760405168
/content/journals/10.1163/156854202760405168
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/content/journals/10.1163/156854202760405168
2002-01-01
2016-12-03

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