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SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT AND DORMANCY OF INSECTS AND MITES FEEDING ON OLIVE: A REVIEW

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image of Netherlands Journal of Zoology
For more content, see Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie (Vol 1-17) and Animal Biology (Vol 53 and onwards).

This review of literature includes an introduction on the origin of the olive tree and lists of 116 species of insects and 30 of mites known to infest it, then the geographic distribution, host plants, feeding habits, voltinism and seasonal history of each of 34 species of phytophagous insects and seven of mites, for which there is sufficient information to justify such treatment. Most of them are monophagous or oligophagous and closely associated with the olive tree, while the remainder have many to a few host plants in addition to olive, but have populations adapted to olive. Of the species covered, 16 are Homoptera, one Hemiptera, one Thysanoptera, five Coleoptera, four Diptera, seven Lepidoptera, six Eriophyoidea and one Tetranychoidea. The review shows that all species, except one, have a seasonal dormancy and for most of them diapause is certain or reasonably suspected to occur. Seasonal displacement does occur in a number of species, especially shortly before or after dormancy. Differences between authors in seasonal history are pointed out and conclusions drawn based on the most convincing papers. Further research on important yet neglected aspects of the life history of olive arthropods is suggested.

10.1163/156854203764817670
/content/journals/10.1163/156854203764817670
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/content/journals/10.1163/156854203764817670
2003-04-01
2016-12-04

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