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Photocatalytic degradation of dimethyl phthalate ester using novel hydrophobic TiO2 pillared montmorillonite photocatalyst

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TiO2 pillared montmorillonites were prepared by introducing Ti4+ into a layer of montmorillonite modified with or without cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The components and texture of the prepared composites were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption and photocatalytic degradation performance of a model environmental endocrine disruptor, dimethyl phthalate ester, were investigated using this newly prepared hydrophobic TiO2 pillared montmorillonite photocatalyst. The adsorption of dimethyl phthalate ester from water varied from 9% to 28% on the prepared hydrophobic photocatalyst. Although the experimental results showed that the photocatalytic activity of the hydrophobic photocatalyst was slightly lower than that of hydrophilic one, electron spin resonance verified that hydroxyl radicals were also generated in hydrophobic TiO2 pillared montmorillonite photocatalyst under UV irradiation. To elucidate the decomposition mechanism of dimethyl phthalate ester, 12 main photocatalytic intermediates were identified during the photocatalytic degradation process, and a plausible degradation mechanism was also proposed.

Affiliations: 1: State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China; 2: State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China;, Email: antc99@gig.ac.cn; 3: State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China; 4: Laboratory of Photochemistry, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China

10.1163/156856708783359531
/content/journals/10.1163/156856708783359531
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/content/journals/10.1163/156856708783359531
2008-01-01
2016-12-07

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