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Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Gas Phase

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The reactions of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase are reviewed. These intermediates are formed by the reaction of olefins with ozone. In the gas phase Criegee intermediates have a biradical character. Initially they are formed as vibrationally hot species. After deactivation by collision with a third body, they can participate in bimolecular reactions with aldehydes, NOx, SO2, water, and so on. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

Affiliations: 1: National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, Japan; 2: Res. Center Adv. Sci. Technol., The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153, Japan

10.1163/156856794X00432
/content/journals/10.1163/156856794x00432
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/content/journals/10.1163/156856794x00432
2017-12-18

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