Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Vision with one eye: a review of visual function following unilateral enucleation

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Spatial Vision
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Seeing and Perceiving.

What happens to vision in the remaining eye following the loss of vision in the fellow eye? Does the one-eyed individual have supernormal visual ability with the remaining eye in order to adapt and compensate for the loss of binocularity and the binocular depth cue, stereopsis? There are subtle changes in visual function following the complete loss of one eye from unilateral enucleation. Losing binocularity early in life results in a dissociation in form perception and motion processing: some aspects of visual spatial ability are enhanced, whereas motion processing and oculomotor behaviour appear to be adversely affected suggesting they are intrinsically linked to the presence of binocularity in early life. These differential effects may be due to a number of factors, including plasticity through recruitment of resources to the remaining eye; the absence of binocular inhibitory interactions; and/or years of monocular practice after enucleation. Finally, despite this dissociation of spatial vision and motion processing, research that has examined visual direction and performance on monocular tasks shows adaptive effects as a result of the loss of one eye. Practically speaking, one-eyed individuals maintain perfectly normal lives and are not limited by their lack of binocularity.

Affiliations: 1: Centre for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada; Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada; The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; 2: Centre for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, Canada; Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada; Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada; The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; Vision Science Research Program, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada

10.1163/156856808786451426
/content/journals/10.1163/156856808786451426
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156856808786451426
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156856808786451426
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156856808786451426
2008-11-01
2016-12-10

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Spatial Vision — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation