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Motion: The long and short of it

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image of Spatial Vision
For more content, see Multisensory Research and Seeing and Perceiving.

Several authors have proposed that motion is analyzed by two separate processes: short-range and long-range. We claim that the differences between short-range and long-range motion phenomena are a direct consequence of the stimuli used in the two paradigms and are not evidence for the existence of two qualitatively different motion processes. We propose that a single style of motion analysis, similar to the well known Reichardt and Marr-Ullman motion detectors, underlies all motion phenomena. Although there are different detectors of this type specialized for different visual attributes (namely first-order and second-order stimuli), they all share the same mode of operation. We review the studies of second-order motion stimuli to show that they share the basic phenomena observed for first-order stimuli. The similarity across stimulus types suggests, not parallel streams of motion extraction, one short-range and passive and the other long-range and intelligent, but a concatenation of a common mode of initial motion extraction followed by a general inference process.

Affiliations: 1: Departement de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3J7; 2: Experimental Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN 9QG, UK

10.1163/156856889X00077
/content/journals/10.1163/156856889x00077
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/content/journals/10.1163/156856889x00077
1989-01-01
2016-10-01

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