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Full Access A Mixed Approach to the Work-Motherhood Relation: An Application of Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Generalized Linear Models

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A Mixed Approach to the Work-Motherhood Relation: An Application of Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Generalized Linear Models

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For content published from 1960-2001, see International Journal of Comparative Sociology.

Abstract Female labor force participation and total fertility rates have been negatively correlated until the early ’80s. By the end of that decade, however, the relationship changed sign. Scholars have suggested a close link between individual reproductive behavior, labor market participation and institutional contexts, but we still lack clear evidence of the underlying micro-level mechanism. We propose the use of complementary techniques, fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Generalized Linear Models, as the different assumptions underlying the two, combinatory vs. additive, may lead to new insights on how the combination of institutional features can produce different outcomes in terms of the work-motherhood relationship.

Abstract Female labor force participation and total fertility rates have been negatively correlated until the early ’80s. By the end of that decade, however, the relationship changed sign. Scholars have suggested a close link between individual reproductive behavior, labor market participation and institutional contexts, but we still lack clear evidence of the underlying micro-level mechanism. We propose the use of complementary techniques, fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Generalized Linear Models, as the different assumptions underlying the two, combinatory vs. additive, may lead to new insights on how the combination of institutional features can produce different outcomes in terms of the work-motherhood relationship.

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/content/journals/10.1163/15691330-12341251
2013-01-01
2016-12-03

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