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Informal and Formal Networking among Elite Mexican Capitalists and Politicians

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image of Comparative Sociology
For content published from 1960-2001, see International Journal of Comparative Sociology.

This essay explores the importance of formal and informal network linkages among Mexico's leading capitalists and politicians from 1970 through 2000. It demonstrates that scholars have been misled in their conclusions about capitalist-politician connections because they have relied on shared, formal positions, rather than on numerous other means of contact. This essay also demonstrates the significant influence exerted by elite mentors, who often provide a bridge between other elites. It suggests that in most countries, a reliance on organizations as a means of measuring networking contacts has led to equally misleading conclusions. Finally, within specific leadership groups, elites share close ties with each other, ties that have impacted on policy issues and ideology.

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/content/journals/10.1163/156913303100418726
2003-03-01
2016-12-09

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