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Parliamentarians as Errand Boys in France, Britain and the United States

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image of Comparative Sociology
For content published from 1960-2001, see International Journal of Comparative Sociology.

Comparison of three democracies that practice the single member constituency, the common denominator of which is the importance parliamentarians grant to the local issues in their electoral constituencies, often to the detriment of their roles as national legislators and holders of popular legitimacy. These "local servitudes" that entail frequent visits to the constituency and sustained contact with the electors, are examined in terms of tending to the local electoral garden. Emphasis is placed on the similarities between parliamentarians' local preoccupations, in spite of the differences that exist between these three political regimes.

Affiliations: 1: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France; University of California, Los Angeles, USA

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/content/journals/10.1163/156913307x233791
2007-10-01
2016-12-06

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