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Financial Sector Development and Remittances in Pacific Island Economies: How Do They Help the World's Two Most Recipient-Dependent Countries?

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[In the context of the current recession in industrialized countries and the resultant dim prospects for exports from small Pacific island countries, mobilization of foreign exchange earnings assumes considerable importance. The dependency of Samoa and Tonga on inward remittances is well known, as the two Polynesian island countries in recent years have been among the first top ten remittance recipient countries of the world. This paper examines the long-run nexus between economic growth and inward remittances during a three-decade period (1981-2008). The paper also discusses some important policy implications arising out of the study's findings., Abstract In the context of the current recession in industrialized countries and the resultant dim prospects for exports from small Pacific island countries, mobilization of foreign exchange earnings assumes considerable importance. The dependency of Samoa and Tonga on inward remittances is well known, as the two Polynesian island countries in recent years have been among the first top ten remittance recipient countries of the world. This paper examines the long-run nexus between economic growth and inward remittances during a three-decade period (1981-2008). The paper also discusses some important policy implications arising out of the study’s findings.]

Affiliations: 1: School of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics, the University of the South Pacific, Fiji Islands;, Email: jayaraman_tk@usp.ac; 2: Centre for Economic Studies, Faculty of Business and Finance, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (Perak-Campus), Malaysia;, Email: choongck@utar.edu.my; 3: School of Government, Development & International Affairs, Faculty of Business and Economics, The University of the South Pacific, Fiji Islands;, Email: ronaldkmr@yahoo.com

10.1163/156914911X610376
/content/journals/10.1163/156914911x610376
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/content/journals/10.1163/156914911x610376
2011-09-01
2016-12-03

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