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Full Access Comparing Peer Reviews: The Universal Periodic Review of the UN Human Rights Council and the African Peer Review Mechanism

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Comparing Peer Reviews: The Universal Periodic Review of the UN Human Rights Council and the African Peer Review Mechanism

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AbstractThe Universal Periodic Review Mechanism (UPR) of the UN Human Rights Council and the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) reflect a growing trend in international organizations to utilize peer review processes to assess and improve member state governance and human rights performance. The two mechanisms are distinct in many ways. For example, the APRM undertakes a more in-depth and rigorous examination of a broader range of issues. Both review mechanisms, however, also have similarities e.g. they emphasize follow-up and actions to be taken as a result of the reviews and are products of a consensus decision-making process based on voluntary engagement. They represent an evolutionary process by which international norms can be integrated in a national context.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Community Development and Applied EconomicsDepartment of Political Science, University of Vermontemcmahon@uvm.edu; 2: Governance and Public Admnistration DivisionUnited Nations Economic Commission for AfricaAddis AbabaEthiopiakBusia@uneca.org; 3: University of Vermont

10.1163/15692108-12341265
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AbstractThe Universal Periodic Review Mechanism (UPR) of the UN Human Rights Council and the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) reflect a growing trend in international organizations to utilize peer review processes to assess and improve member state governance and human rights performance. The two mechanisms are distinct in many ways. For example, the APRM undertakes a more in-depth and rigorous examination of a broader range of issues. Both review mechanisms, however, also have similarities e.g. they emphasize follow-up and actions to be taken as a result of the reviews and are products of a consensus decision-making process based on voluntary engagement. They represent an evolutionary process by which international norms can be integrated in a national context.

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1. Abraham Megna A New Chapter for Human Rights 2006 International Service for Human Rights
2. Abraham Megna Building the New Human Rights Council: Outcome and analysis of the institution-building year 2007 Geneva International Service for Human Rights
3. African Union Declaration on the New Common Initiative 2001 Lusaka AHG/Decl.1 (XXXVII)
4. African Union Declaration on the Implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development 2002 Durban (NEPAD), ASS/AU/Decl.1(I) Chene, Marie and Dell, Gillian. Comparative Assessment of Anti-Corruption Conventions’ Review Mechanisms, U4 Expert Answer, Transparency International, 2008
5. Brett Rachel "“ A Curate’s Egg: The UN Human Rights Council, Year 3”" 2009 Geneva Quaker United Nations Office
6. Flockhart Trine Socializing Democratic Norms: The Role of International Organizations for the Construction of Europe 2005 New York Palgrave Macmillan, New York
7. Stiftung Friedrich Ebert "“ Report on The Human Rights Council’s Performance To-date”" 2010 November
8. Herbert Ross , Gruzd Steven The African Peer Review Mechanism: Lessons from the Pioneers 2008 Johannesburg South African Institute for International Affairs
9. Lauren Paul "“ To Preserve and Build on its Achievements and to Redress its Shortcomings: The Journey from the Commission on Human Rights to the Human Rights Council ”" 2007 Vol Human Rights Quarterly, vol. 29 #2
10. McMahon Edward R. , Baker Scott Piecing a Democratic Quilt: Universal Norms and Regional Organizations 2006 Bloomfeld Kumerian Press
11. Meblle Nobuntu " The APRM Process in South Africa " AfriMap 2010
12. Pagani Fabrizio "‘ Peer Review: A Tool for Cooperation and Change – An Analysis of the OECD Working Method ’" OECD SG/LEG 2002
13. Papoe Adotey " Ghana and the APRM Process: A Critical Assessment " AfriMap 2007 June
14. AfriMap A Critical Review of the APRM Process in Rwanda 2007
15. Pevehouse Jon C. Democracy from Above: Regional Organizations and Democratization 2005 New York Cambridge University Press http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511491078
16. Vriens Lauren "“ Troubles Plague UN Council ”" Council on Foreign Relations 2009
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2013-01-01
2016-12-10

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