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Full Access What do we really know about Women’s Rites in the Israelite Family Context?

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What do we really know about Women’s Rites in the Israelite Family Context?

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What we know about the roles of women in Israelite family religion is a topic in need of reassessment. In this article, the author evaluates a number of common claims which have been made about family religion and gender. These include the idea that goddess worship was especially important to women; that Judean pillar figurines were used primarily or exclusively by women in their ritual activities; that the religious practices of ancient Israelite women overlapped little with those of men; and that birth-related ritual contexts were a special preserve of women.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Religious Studies, Brown University Providence, RI 02912-1927, Email: Saul_Olyan@brown.edu

10.1163/156921210X500503
/content/journals/10.1163/156921210x500503
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What we know about the roles of women in Israelite family religion is a topic in need of reassessment. In this article, the author evaluates a number of common claims which have been made about family religion and gender. These include the idea that goddess worship was especially important to women; that Judean pillar figurines were used primarily or exclusively by women in their ritual activities; that the religious practices of ancient Israelite women overlapped little with those of men; and that birth-related ritual contexts were a special preserve of women.

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/content/journals/10.1163/156921210x500503
2010-06-01
2016-12-03

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