Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access The Relevance of Evidentiality for Ancient Greek: Some Explorative Steps through Plato

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

The Relevance of Evidentiality for Ancient Greek: Some Explorative Steps through Plato

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Journal of Greek Linguistics

The present paper aims at drawing renewed attention to the relevance of evidentiality for Ancient Greek by means of a number of case studies taken from two of Plato’s works (namely the Apologia Socratis and Crito). First, I briefly identify the conceptual framework within which the main analysis of Attic evidential phenomena occurs. Then, I provide a preliminary overview of (possible) linguistic means used in marking evidentiality in Ancient Greek (formal aspect). I also explore the way in which evidential values are conveyed (semantic aspect). Certain Attic particles (e.g., ára, dḗpou), functional oppositions in complementizing patterns (e.g., hóti vs. hōs), defective verbal forms (e.g., ēmí), and “auxiliaries” (e.g., dokéō) are revealed as evidential markers or “strategies”. These are able to express inferential, presumptive, reportative, quotative, visual, and participatory evidentiality. The oblique optative is suggested to have evidential overtones as well. In summary, the paper endeavors to show the importance of “evidentiality” as an integrative conceptual frame for the descriptive analysis of certain Ancient Greek phenomena.

Affiliations: 1: KU Leuven raf.vanrooy@arts.kuleuven.be

10.1163/15699846-01502002
/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01502002
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

The present paper aims at drawing renewed attention to the relevance of evidentiality for Ancient Greek by means of a number of case studies taken from two of Plato’s works (namely the Apologia Socratis and Crito). First, I briefly identify the conceptual framework within which the main analysis of Attic evidential phenomena occurs. Then, I provide a preliminary overview of (possible) linguistic means used in marking evidentiality in Ancient Greek (formal aspect). I also explore the way in which evidential values are conveyed (semantic aspect). Certain Attic particles (e.g., ára, dḗpou), functional oppositions in complementizing patterns (e.g., hóti vs. hōs), defective verbal forms (e.g., ēmí), and “auxiliaries” (e.g., dokéō) are revealed as evidential markers or “strategies”. These are able to express inferential, presumptive, reportative, quotative, visual, and participatory evidentiality. The oblique optative is suggested to have evidential overtones as well. In summary, the paper endeavors to show the importance of “evidentiality” as an integrative conceptual frame for the descriptive analysis of certain Ancient Greek phenomena.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/15699846/16/1/15699846_016_01_s002_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01502002&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01502002
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01502002
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01502002
2016-01-01
2017-12-11

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation