Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Open Access Subject-Verb Agreement with Coordinated Subjects in Ancient Greek

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Subject-Verb Agreement with Coordinated Subjects in Ancient Greek

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

A Treebank-Based Study

image of Journal of Greek Linguistics

In Ancient Greek, as well as in other languages, whenever agreement is triggered by two or more coordinated phrases, two different constructions are allowed: either the agreement can be controlled by the coordinated phrase as a whole, or it can be triggered by just one of the coordinated words. In spite of the amount of information that can be read on this topic in grammars of Ancient Greek, much is still to be known even at a general descriptive level. More importantly, the data still lack a convincing explanation. In this paper, we focus on a special domain of agreement (subject and verb agreement) and on one morphological feature that is expected to covary (number). We discuss the agreement in number for conjoined phrases, by revising some of the modern hypotheses with the support of the empirical evidence that can be collected from the available syntactically annotated corpora of Ancient Greek (treebanks). Results are interpreted according to syntactic features, cognitive factors and semantic properties of the coordinated phrases.

Affiliations: 1: Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Berlin francesco.mambrini@dainst.de ; 2: Univesità Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan marco.passarotti@unicatt.it

10.1163/15699846-01601003
/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01601003
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading

In Ancient Greek, as well as in other languages, whenever agreement is triggered by two or more coordinated phrases, two different constructions are allowed: either the agreement can be controlled by the coordinated phrase as a whole, or it can be triggered by just one of the coordinated words. In spite of the amount of information that can be read on this topic in grammars of Ancient Greek, much is still to be known even at a general descriptive level. More importantly, the data still lack a convincing explanation. In this paper, we focus on a special domain of agreement (subject and verb agreement) and on one morphological feature that is expected to covary (number). We discuss the agreement in number for conjoined phrases, by revising some of the modern hypotheses with the support of the empirical evidence that can be collected from the available syntactically annotated corpora of Ancient Greek (treebanks). Results are interpreted according to syntactic features, cognitive factors and semantic properties of the coordinated phrases.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/journals/15699846/16/1/15699846_016_01_s004_text.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01601003&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01601003
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01601003
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15699846-01601003
2016-01-01
2018-09-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation