Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

AL-SHANFARĀ AND "THE MOUNTAIN POEM" OF IBN KHAFĀJA: SOME OBSERVATIONS ON PATTERNS OF INTERTEXTUALITY

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Journal of Arabic Literature

The debt owed by the Andalusī poet Ibn Khafāja (d. 533/1138) to the sa'ālīk for the development of his symbolic/poetic idiom has been examined closely by Nadia Yaqub in her article, "Some of Us Must Depart: An Intertextual Reading of the Mountain Poem by Ibn Khafāja" (Journal of Arabic Literature 30, 1999). This article carries the association even further, arguing that much of the lexical and thematic stock of the Bā'iyya ("The Mountain Poem") of Ibn Khafāja is directly transplanted from the Lāmiyya of al-Shanfarā. A comparative reading of the two qasīdas , with close attention paid to the shared motifs and topoi, illustrates a key mechanism in Ibn Khafāja's adaptation of the early Arabic thematic repertoire to his own poetics. This technique can be described as the mechanism of "folding," whereby the discrete topoi and motifs of early Arabic verse are collapsed into single figures with polyvalent significance. This technique is illustrated in Ibn Khafāja's redeployment of the traditional lyric topoi of wolves, the lightning watch, and mountains. The thematic conflation embodied by the final motif of the Bā'iyya, the mountain, offers a comment on the state of Andalusī poetics at the time of Ibn Khafāja, to wit, the fatigue of convention with its densely layered symbolic burdens.

10.1163/157006403764980587
/content/journals/10.1163/157006403764980587
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157006403764980587
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/157006403764980587
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/157006403764980587
2003-04-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Journal of Arabic Literature — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation