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Eulenspiegel-Drucke in niederländischer Sprache von ca. 1520 bis 1830: eine Bibliographie

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[This contribution offers a bibliography of Dutch-language printed editions of the Uilenspiegel as compiled by Paul Vriesema before his untimely death in 1989. Originally, it was to be part of an international project, which was an initiative of the Freundeskreis Till Eulenspiegel in Schöppenstedt and of the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel. The non-German part, however, was never published due to insufficient funds. The editors have now updated Vriesema's material up to May 2001, though retaining the original criteria for inclusion and the method of description. This means that translations having appeared in the Netherlands were not included, nor popular prints, or new Dutch texts based on the Uilenspiegel material. The descriptions for each item contain the following sections:

1. heading with information drawn from the imprint

2. diplomatic representation of the title-page

3. bibliographical format, collation formula and number of pages; amount of 'histories'. [N.B.: the editors have not made use of the STCN fingerprint, however useful]

4. location and shelf mark, relevant copy-related information

5. bibliographical commentary

The total number of editions up to 1830 is 83, in 118 copies. To date no copies are known of 13 editions, the existence of which can be established with some certainty on the basis of later editions or other information (these items are marked with an *). With regards to place of publication and the textual tradition, two groups can be distinguished: a Northern-Netherlands and a Southern-Netherlands one. Characteristic for the Southern Netherlands is for instance the expurgated language: any material which might be considered offensive to the clergy has been cleared. Schematically the division is as follows:

1501-1600: South 5, North 2, Total 7

1601-1750: South 4, North 8, Total 12

1751-1830: South 31, North 33, Total 64

Total: South 40, North 43, Total 83

One of the questions which still require an answer is how the Northern-Netherlands tradition developed from that of the Southern Netherlands; for instance although the Antwerp printer Jan III van Ghelen was active in Rotterdam in 1606-10, Harmen Janszoon Muller in Amsterdam already printed an Uilenspiegel in 1600. In addition, it still needs to be researched whether there exists a difference between the earlier editions (before 1670) and the later ones (after 1750) of both traditions. The intervening years form a considerable gap and yield only a few editions (NL 18 in the North, NL 12-16 in the South). As we can only rely on the preserved editions, the question remains whether there was indeed less interest in the Uilenspiegel in that period. What is striking on the basis of the present findings, however, is that six times as many editions are known from the years 1750-1830 than from the preceding 150 years: Uilenspiegel did not become a really popular chapbook until the second half of the 18th century., This contribution offers a bibliography of Dutch-language printed editions of the Uilenspiegel as compiled by Paul Vriesema before his untimely death in 1989. Originally, it was to be part of an international project, which was an initiative of the Freundeskreis Till Eulenspiegel in Schöppenstedt and of the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel. The non-German part, however, was never published due to insufficient funds. The editors have now updated Vriesema's material up to May 2001, though retaining the original criteria for inclusion and the method of description. This means that translations having appeared in the Netherlands were not included, nor popular prints, or new Dutch texts based on the Uilenspiegel material. The descriptions for each item contain the following sections:

1. heading with information drawn from the imprint

2. diplomatic representation of the title-page

3. bibliographical format, collation formula and number of pages; amount of 'histories'. [N.B.: the editors have not made use of the STCN fingerprint, however useful]

4. location and shelf mark, relevant copy-related information

5. bibliographical commentary

The total number of editions up to 1830 is 83, in 118 copies. To date no copies are known of 13 editions, the existence of which can be established with some certainty on the basis of later editions or other information (these items are marked with an *). With regards to place of publication and the textual tradition, two groups can be distinguished: a Northern-Netherlands and a Southern-Netherlands one. Characteristic for the Southern Netherlands is for instance the expurgated language: any material which might be considered offensive to the clergy has been cleared. Schematically the division is as follows:

1501-1600: South 5, North 2, Total 7

1601-1750: South 4, North 8, Total 12

1751-1830: South 31, North 33, Total 64

Total: South 40, North 43, Total 83

One of the questions which still require an answer is how the Northern-Netherlands tradition developed from that of the Southern Netherlands; for instance although the Antwerp printer Jan III van Ghelen was active in Rotterdam in 1606-10, Harmen Janszoon Muller in Amsterdam already printed an Uilenspiegel in 1600. In addition, it still needs to be researched whether there exists a difference between the earlier editions (before 1670) and the later ones (after 1750) of both traditions. The intervening years form a considerable gap and yield only a few editions (NL 18 in the North, NL 12-16 in the South). As we can only rely on the preserved editions, the question remains whether there was indeed less interest in the Uilenspiegel in that period. What is striking on the basis of the present findings, however, is that six times as many editions are known from the years 1750-1830 than from the preceding 150 years: Uilenspiegel did not become a really popular chapbook until the second half of the 18th century.]

10.1163/157006902760206153
/content/journals/10.1163/157006902760206153
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/content/journals/10.1163/157006902760206153
2002-05-01
2016-12-08

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